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#1

Northeast
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From: Northeast Vic, VIC
Joined: 27 August 2016
Posts: 1,474
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04 September 2021 11:01 pm

Evening all.

A friend of mine found this ring about 12 months ago in the Beechworth region of Victoria.

I am going to put it up in the For Sale section here for him at some stage but he wants to find out a little more about it if he can.

It has a nice flower pattern around the outside but then has a little nugget plonked in the middle of it - even has some quartz for good measure.

Has a Maker's Mark of WHE but I am unable to find anything in an extremely long list of marks.

Due to the area found and the nugget on the top he is guessing it was lost sometime between 1860 and 1920. Possibly made in Beechworth but could really have been made anywhere and brought to the region.

He has a testing kit and it reads as greater than 22K. 9.26 grams in weight.

Would anybody be able to assist with some knowledge re: the Maker's Mark or any other provenance?

1630756418_mercer_s_ring_1.jpg

1630756436_mercer_s_ring_on_scale.jpg

1630756459_ring_close_up.jpg

1630756483_ring_makers_mark.jpg

9 users like this post: aussiefarmer, silver, numpty, Detectist, Deepseeker, Eldorado, MegsyB007, Sanguine, golddiggerart

#2

Phil8303
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Joined: 25 July 2021
Posts: 136
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04 September 2021 11:30 pm

Might be William Herbert Eldridge jewellery?

WILLIAM HERBERT ELDRIDGE 1867-1944
William Herbert Eldridge was born at Worthing, Sussex, England the son of Amos Eldridge, a watchmaker & jeweller and Emily Elizabeth Quaife. Amos was born on 21 Mar 1844 at Ewhurst the son of William Eldridge, a labourer and Hannah Sellman.

The 1871 English census shows William aged 4 at 13 South Street Worthing, Sussex with his parents Amos, a watchmaker and jeweller age 27 born Ewhurst and Elizabeth (sic) age 26 born Battle, and his siblings Sabina age 7 born Battle, Ed age 6 born Southbro Kent, and Wm age 4, Maud age 1 and an unnamed male baby age 1m all born at Worthing.

The 1881 English census shows William as a 13 year old at 28 South Street Worthing, Sussex with his parents Amos, a jeweller age 37 born Battle and Emily age 36 born Battle, and his siblings Sabina age 17 and Edward age 15 both born at Tunbridge Wells and Maud age 10, Claud age 9, Violet age 6, Daisy age 4 and Clive age 2 all born at Worthing, Sussex.

William Herbert migrated to Australia as he married Mary Ann Hall at All Saints Church of England St Kilda Victoria on 27 Jan 1890. He was a storekeeper, born in Worthing, Sussex, England, the son of Amos Eldridge, a Jeweller, and Emily Elizabeth Quaife. Mary was born in 1863, the daughter of George Hall and Sarah Ann Fagan. Their first child was born at Carlton with the remainder at Essendon.

Mary Ann died at Mont Park in 1943 and was shown as aged 76. An Inquest was held on 18 Jun 1943 and her cause of death found to be cardio vascular degeneration. William died at Bendigo in 1944 aged 78.
(Source:http://members.iinet.net.au/~rgkje/eldridge/whe.html)

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#3

grubstake
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From: Perth, WA
Joined: 20 October 2014
Posts: 3,063
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04 September 2021 11:45 pm

Is the design of the surround just "a nice flower pattern" or is it perhaps an heraldic Tudor rose?

1630759436_tudor_rose.jpg


Where it is, there it is.

#4

silver
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Joined: 19 December 2013
Posts: 18,308
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04 September 2021 11:52 pm

Maybe take it to the museum so they can have a looksee... be worth more to them if it is a part of history (just a thought)


What a great day ! ,... " I'll see you in the field ".

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#5

silver
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Joined: 19 December 2013
Posts: 18,308
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05 September 2021 12:00 am

Link to info
https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … p?id=19391
another link
https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … p?id=29336

Last edited by silver (05 September 2021 12:05 am)


What a great day ! ,... " I'll see you in the field ".

#6

Northeast
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From: Northeast Vic, VIC
Joined: 27 August 2016
Posts: 1,474
Member
05 September 2021 12:38 am

Thanks for the research Phil. I see that William’s father was the jeweller and he was a storekeeper once in Australia. I suppose he could have also dabbled in some jewelling.

Thanks Grubstake. Yes, it very well could be a Tudor rose. Is there then some special element if it is a Tudor rose? Surely it is not royal or anything? yikes

Thanks Silver. The friend that found it does intend to take it to a museum but with lockdown that isn’t happening. I also wondered if museums would even have jewellery specialists there? I thought maybe an antique jeweller?

I started down the rabbit hole of those links and then their links and then their links - thanks Silver, I think they are going to come in very handy.

Cash Brown at the MADE museum in Ballarat might be the first port of call.

thumbsup

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#7

grubstake
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From: Perth, WA
Joined: 20 October 2014
Posts: 3,063
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05 September 2021 09:57 am

Northeast wrote:

Thanks Grubstake. Yes, it very well could be a Tudor rose. Is there then some special element if it is a Tudor rose? Surely it is not royal or anything? yikes

If it is a Tudor rose, my guess would be that its significance is linked to a family origin in a particular UK city or county. But I guess it may be a symbol indicating English origin more generally, rather than Welsh (leek), Scottish (thistle), Irish (shamrock), etc.


Where it is, there it is.

1 user likes this post: Northeast

#8

Northeast
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From: Northeast Vic, VIC
Joined: 27 August 2016
Posts: 1,474
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05 September 2021 10:03 am

Makes sense GS, thanks again

#9

OzzieAu
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From: Adelaide
Joined: 04 November 2014
Posts: 1,662
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05 September 2021 06:47 pm

Northeast, that ring would make for a good auction on here.... it’s a ripper thumbsup


GPX5000..2xEvo’s..Detech 18CC...Multi Kruzer.. Simplex +...ProFind.. PulseDive, etc.

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#10

aussiefarmer
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Joined: 26 July 2015
Posts: 4,812
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05 September 2021 07:11 pm

Do you think the nugget is replacing a missing stone or slapped on top or maybe an experimental or one of special peice.


Wish in one hand and poo in the other , See which one fills up first !

1 user likes this post: Northeast

#11

Jaros
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From: S.E.Qld., QLD
Joined: 11 August 2013
Posts: 15,684
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05 September 2021 07:26 pm

Possibly?


F1A4M2, GPX4500, Exterra 705 Gold, Ace 250, Goldrat 8" Dreammat River Sluice.

#12

Northeast
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From: Northeast Vic, VIC
Joined: 27 August 2016
Posts: 1,474
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05 September 2021 08:07 pm

Yeah, not sure if auctions are allowed on here any more. But would certainly give a good indication of its 'value'.

AF - I've got no idea but it seems like a weird thing to do. Your idea of it replacing a lost stone might be right on the money. Maybe it is the first gold nugget some migrant found in Australia or the first they found on the Beechworth goldfields. It is not something I've ever seen before - plonking a nugget on top of a ring. gold-nugget

#13

aussiefarmer
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Joined: 26 July 2015
Posts: 4,812
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05 September 2021 08:27 pm

Yeah and the bubbles around the nugget have no where near the quality of the rest of the fine work.


Wish in one hand and poo in the other , See which one fills up first !

#14

MegsyB007
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Joined: 10 September 2018
Posts: 1,622
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08 September 2021 01:52 am

What an interesting little ring!

If it doesn't have any other marks on it apart from the WHE, then it wasn't put through an assay office to be hallmarked, and that's often where the Markers Mark is registered for us to find it online today.

I didn't have any luck finding WHE anywhere, which suggests to me that it was possibly made here before access to a government assay office was available to them to properly hallmark and register it, that they have to do by law if they were selling it. That also suggests it was possibly made by the person who wore it, or gave it to their sweetheart to wear, and was never up for sale.

I think that is potentially quite an old ring, and your mate should definitely have a museum or antiques jeweller check it out.

Keep us informed on this story please. I'd like to know the outcome! smile

Cheers,
Megsy


The Australian bush - love it - take care of it.

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#15

Northeast
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From: Northeast Vic, VIC
Joined: 27 August 2016
Posts: 1,474
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10 September 2021 08:18 am

Thanks Megsy.

I have emailed Cash Browne with a few photos. Hopefully she will be able put me onto an expert in the field.

Will certainly keep everyone updated thumbsup

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#16

Northeast
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From: Northeast Vic, VIC
Joined: 27 August 2016
Posts: 1,474
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13 September 2021 09:55 pm

Evening all,

Had a response from Cash Brown re: the ring.

Wasn't able to help specifically but was able to provide some good leads. Hopefully able to do some further research/reading later in the week.

I have copied Cash's email in full as there are some links included that may be useful to others.

Very nice of Cash to reply at all let alone providing some good info thumbsup

Cheers, N.E.

"Thank you for getting in touch

Each makers mark is can be traceable, but with hard work and luck… and this gives you the area where the maker was active and the years. It is an inexact science though.

You can look up these initials in literature dedicated to the topic but there is nothing online as it’s a pretty niche area.

See:

https://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/2590479

this is the main book we used.

We have found makers marks not listed in the literature but surmised their identity through advertisements placed in newspapers of the day – these can be searched through Trove.

W.H.E could be Wagner Hogarth Erichson for example (I made this up but they are real names of jewellers at the time)

I think if you write to the Australiana Society, someone there may put up their hand to help you … I unfortunately have no answers other than that the ring was probably cast – therefore an off the shelf piece which was commonly available for miners to then have their nugget soldered to the ring. It was the man bling of the day.

This ring is therefore probably later 19th or early 20th century as the pre made ones didn’t come about until the second rushes from the 1870s onwards. The initials may be from an overseas manufacturer too – which would have wholesaled the rings to local jewellers. This would make it extra hard to track.

If it was cast locally, then the initials should be traceable as not many makers did this.

Here is the link to the catalogue we made which is the most up to date publication on the topic of Goldfields Jewellery there is.

https://issuu.com/cashbrown/docs/19_c_b … _jewellery

Trevor Hancock was the main person to help identify things – if you can track him down he may want to help, he is a jewellery dealer.

You will probably need some super sleuth skills!

Good luck and let me know how you go – am sorry I can’t be of much assistance.

Best

Cash

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