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#76

xcvator
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From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
14 June 2020 04:17 pm

What I learnt today ops

1/ when you turn on a wet tile saw you get wet sad

2/ if you work back to front you don't get nearly as wet thumbsup

I think a waterproof apron will not go astray lol

4 users like this post: RM Outback, Dihusky, LoneWolf, Mackka

#77

Pat Hogen
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Joined: 02 January 2018
Posts: 336
Member
14 June 2020 06:43 pm

I think a waterproof apron will not go astray - or a hood over the blade, trying to think of what would do for a blade cover, maybe a bit of bent garden hose that has been heated and bent to shape and suspended from a rod over the cutting area cool


Absinthe makes the heart grow fonder

#78

LoneWolf
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From: Gold Coast, QLD
Joined: 12 April 2016
Posts: 4,885
Member
14 June 2020 09:21 pm

A piece of 40mm PVC pipe cut in half Horizontally will work... wink

I haven't forgotten you xcavator.... wink Working on some rocks for you...

LW..

Last edited by LoneWolf (14 June 2020 09:24 pm)


Growing Old is Inevitable.... Growing Up is Optional.... Union Proud and Union Strong... A.M.W.U Active Member....

1 user likes this post: xcvator

#79

xcvator
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From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
14 June 2020 11:49 pm

LoneWolf wrote:

A piece of 40mm PVC pipe cut in half Horizontally will work... wink

I haven't forgotten you xcavator.... wink Working on some rocks for you...

LW..

I'll work on postage costs for you too plus a bit thumbsup

There is a cover over the blade, but never having used 1 of these things before I filled the water tank up , stood in front of it ,and turned it on angel just got a tad wet when water was thrown every where big_smile Then I remembered a youtube tip about working back to front. Stand at the back of the saw and bring the stone towards you, result, very little water splashing over you, yay perfect

1 user likes this post: LoneWolf

#80

xcvator
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From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
19 June 2020 07:45 pm

Almost finished and some playing around has been done, I can now use the slant cabber inside where it's nice and warm in winter perfect
I made up a "spray skirt " from this stuff https://www.clarkrubber.com.au/products … 0mm-x-30mm , bloody hard to cut in a reasonably neat fashion, 3mm thick, had to use tin snips hmm so it's a bit ragged in spots but it does stop 90% of the spray dispersion.
Sometimes things are just meant to be, I was looking in the shed for something to store the cabber in when I spotted a kids toy box, tried it, and you would think I'd measured it to fit every thing into it thumbsup Tip it upside down and I can sit the water bucket on top

1592556058_img_20200619_181637.jpg

1592556075_img_20200619_181657.jpg

Hard to see in the picture, but the skirt is about 25mm above the lap disc and 15mm outside the disc.

2 users like this post: 2lateagain, LoneWolf

#81

RockRat
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Joined: 26 May 2018
Posts: 372
Member
20 June 2020 09:28 am

Looks the ducks guts, great job, now we want to
see what you can do. gemstone

Last edited by RockRat (20 June 2020 09:30 am)

1 user likes this post: Dihusky

#82

xcvator
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From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
20 June 2020 04:41 pm

Your wish is my command RR big_smile

Yes , there are some scratch's, this is my 1st go sad

1st mistake, picking a little slab that the flat sides weren't parallel
2nd mistake, not centering the dop
3rd mistake, water container is not big enough, I will go to a 20 litre bucket

Started with 80 grit diamond disc, then 150, 320 and 600, then went to the home made w&d discs , 600,800 and 1200

1592631563_img_20200620_150552.jpg

1592631580_img_20200620_150637.jpg

1592631590_img_20200620_150650.jpg

1592631614_img_20200620_150750.jpg

1592631634_img_20200620_150901.jpg

5 users like this post: 2lateagain, LoneWolf, Chiron52, Wally69, CreviceSucker

#83

RockRat
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Joined: 26 May 2018
Posts: 372
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20 June 2020 04:54 pm

Well done, you will be an expert in no time. big_smile
Patience and a good eye will get you there. thumbsup

#84

xcvator
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From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
24 June 2020 08:30 pm

1592990457_p6240195_2.jpg

This afternoons play around, just ordered some w & d in 2000,2500,3000,5000 and 7000 grits. Next I'll get some upholstery leather off cuts from a mate for polishing discs with cerium oxide.

Those acrylic discs are really handy for diy thumbsup Rock Rat

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#85

xcvator
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From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
09 July 2020 10:10 pm

Dihusky wrote:

Rotational direction shouldn't make any difference, provided the fixing nut is threaded the correct way so it doesn't come undone when you start the motor. Anti-clockwise needs a right hand thread, clockwise needs a left hand thread, looking from the lap end of the shaft. You just work on the side that pushes into the stone.

A master will depend on the laps you're using. The thin topper laps all need a backing plate, often with a magnetic topper glued to it so it grips the lap.

Felt, rubber, acrylic for polishing will all need a backing master, different from the magnetic one, felt and rubber are normally permanently bonded to a backing plate. Acrylic, it's purely for support against stone/hand pressure.

This mob: https://www.gemworld.com.au/products/sh … shing-laps used to have backing plates with a screwed boss in either LH of RH threads, I have some of them which I purchased from them, think they might have been custom made, so could be worth giving them a call, otherwise contact people like Gemcuts for threaded backing plates.

Not saying I'm dumb, just a slow learner, I hadn't really read that bit untill today, Ive been using the side of the wheel that is actually going away from me, tried the the other side where it's coming down and into me , certainly cuts much more aggressively and quickly. I'll save the away side for final scratch removal and polishing

#86

xcvator
Member
From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
09 July 2020 10:26 pm

I need a lot more help on how to mark out cabs, not just the shape but the girdles and forming the domes.Any tricks to learn ?

What are the best stones to learn on, I've got some bits of Rhodonite (good to work with) Sodalite ( like the colour) Labradorite ( love the colour, fractures along lines easily) Rose Quartz (looks good untill it's polished, then it looks insipid (to me, a nothing washed out stone)

Noticed that the "superglue" can penetrate and remove some material where it's been holding the dop (lepodolite, must be a bit porous )

Does the wax/shellac combination ever damage the surface of cabs?

#87

xcvator
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From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
09 July 2020 10:32 pm

Has anybody built their own 8"trim saw, I've got the little tile saw that 2lateagain sent me, cuts well, but the blade is quite thick and tends to shatter/chip some of the rocks so I'd like to get/make a trim saw with a very fine blade, that would make the final shaping much easier

#88

Wally69
Member
From: Sydney
Joined: 13 December 2013
Posts: 3,516
Member
10 July 2020 01:03 am

xcvator wrote:

I need a lot more help on how to mark out cabs, not just the shape but the girdles and forming the domes.Any tricks to learn ?

What are the best stones to learn on, I've got some bits of Rhodonite (good to work with) Sodalite ( like the colour) Labradorite ( love the colour, fractures along lines easily) Rose Quartz (looks good untill it's polished, then it looks insipid (to me, a nothing washed out stone)

Noticed that the "superglue" can penetrate and remove some material where it's been holding the dop (lepodolite, must be a bit porous )

Does the wax/shellac combination ever damage the surface of cabs?

Some novice notes:

I was taught to cut onto the fine silver line of an aluminium pencil held at 90deg using a template for precision symmetry, if they could see any stone outside the mark, I was marched back to the wheel. For dome geometry, I use a “count and rotate” method to balance my cutting, and/or step-cuts at several constant angles on the course wheels to get the general shape of the stone into proportion. Rotate and keep moving, count and balance the cutting for finer wheels, look, look, look and look.

I haven’t had any issues with shellac and wax, would steer clear of glues due to the penetration.

Aventurine (green Quartz) was a cool stone to work with and I would recommend staying away from anything with cracks and texture. Snowflake obsidian and silverstreak obsidian were fun and whatever this is was awesome, have not had anyone positively ID it yet, best guess is petrified palm tree or a manufactured stone who’s secret died with the inventor. Would love to get my hands on more.

1594302834_7d8e79bf-cedd-47e7-aa1e-a0e7e7bccd2a.jpg

8 users like this post: goody2shoes, Pat Hogen, xcvator, Dihusky, Deepseeker, Martyz, sand surfer, LoneWolf

#89

xcvator
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From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
10 July 2020 10:26 am

Thanks Wally thumbsup thumbsup

Last edited by xcvator (10 July 2020 10:26 am)

#90

pinfire opals
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Joined: 16 February 2019
Posts: 415
Banned
10 July 2020 12:05 pm

xcvator wrote:

Thanks Wally thumbsup thumbsup

Have you watched any of Justins youtube vids, he explains in several about all the stuff you are after, thats how I taught myself, have watched every vid several times. Black Opal Direct is the youtube channel from memory.

4 users like this post: Martyz, Dihusky, xcvator, goody2shoes

#91

LoneWolf
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From: Gold Coast, QLD
Joined: 12 April 2016
Posts: 4,885
Member
10 July 2020 08:30 pm

Xcvator, You can just change the blade over to a thin lapidary blade but make sure it has the same size bore (the hole in the middle)...

If you are worried about the gap around the blade, just get a piece of very thin Aluminium and cut a slit halfway along it and slip it around your blade...

LW...


Growing Old is Inevitable.... Growing Up is Optional.... Union Proud and Union Strong... A.M.W.U Active Member....

#92

xcvator
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From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
10 July 2020 08:48 pm

LoneWolf wrote:

Xcvator, You can just change the blade over to a thin lapidary blade but make sure it has the same size bore (the hole in the middle)...

If you are worried about the gap around the blade, just get a piece of very thin Aluminium and cut a slit halfway along it and slip it around your blade...

LW...

I think 1 of these will fit, bore and diameter looks ok, what do you think ?

https://www.bunnings.com.au/kango-115mm … e_p0069763

Can't find a proper lapidary blade with the correct sizes ( 100mm,110mm,115mm [22mm bore]) even with arbor bushes sad

Last edited by xcvator (10 July 2020 08:49 pm)

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#93

sand surfer
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From: bundaberg, QLD
Joined: 21 April 2016
Posts: 920
Member
10 July 2020 10:10 pm

what size is the arbor of the saw xcvator, i have thick(slabbing) and a thin blade for a 7" saw if they fit you can have them ,i don't have the saw anymore and the arbor on my new saw is a different size so they don't fit,the bore on the blades are 5/8"(about 16 mm)


AT PRO international,1 pick ,1 pelican pick,shovel,sieve's,pans, 8" gold rat dream mat river sluice,crazy crusher,elbow grease and a back that scream's don't do it

#94

xcvator
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From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
10 July 2020 10:44 pm

sand surfer wrote:

what size is the arbor of the saw xcvator, i have thick(slabbing) and a thin blade for a 7" saw if they fit you can have them ,i don't have the saw anymore and the arbor on my new saw is a different size so they don't fit,the bore on the blades are 5/8"(about 16 mm)

Thanks for the offer mate, but my little tile saw only takes a max of 115mm diam and is a 22mm bore, I think the 1 from Bunnings will fit, but I'll take the original blade and a vernier with me to check

1 user likes this post: LoneWolf

#95

LoneWolf
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From: Gold Coast, QLD
Joined: 12 April 2016
Posts: 4,885
Member
10 July 2020 10:50 pm

Wow that seems to be a large bore... I think mine is only 16mm.. I will measure it tomorrow...

But no those blades wont work, I think they will chip your stone pretty easily... but I haven't tried that type...

My tile saw takes 7" blades but I can use a 8" I think... there's enough room there for it...

Is there room under ... as you can always cut the slot in the saw a bit longer to take the larger blade.. It has been done on mine..

Have you looked on Aussie Sapphire or Gemcuts website?

I found some for you but only a 20mm bore (gem-cuts on ebay)... think you might need to convert with bushings from 22mm down to imperial or metric to do what you want...

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/5-Thin-Lapi … SwSnZe6lG6

LW...

Last edited by LoneWolf (10 July 2020 11:13 pm)


Growing Old is Inevitable.... Growing Up is Optional.... Union Proud and Union Strong... A.M.W.U Active Member....

2 users like this post: xcvator, pinfire opals

#96

Dihusky
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From: Gold Coast, QLD
Joined: 16 June 2017
Posts: 1,519
Member
10 July 2020 11:38 pm

xcvator wrote:

Has anybody built their own 8"trim saw, I've got the little tile saw that 2lateagain sent me, cuts well, but the blade is quite thick and tends to shatter/chip some of the rocks so I'd like to get/make a trim saw with a very fine blade, that would make the final shaping much easier

Tile blades are totally wrong for what you're doing, too thick and slow. You can get diamond blades that are a lot thinner, they come in two types; sintered and plated, the one to go for is sintered as they last a very long time in comparison to the plated blades.

We have a tile saw currently and use a 0.5mm thick sintered blade, cuts like a hot knife through butter and easy to control the stone.

One thing to remember is diamond cuts at the rate it wants to cut, forcing a blade to cut will only damage the blade, the stone and possibly yourself, cutting is a job of patients not rush.

3 users like this post: xcvator, LoneWolf, pinfire opals

#97

sand surfer
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From: bundaberg, QLD
Joined: 21 April 2016
Posts: 920
Member
11 July 2020 09:15 am

all good mate if you make one yourself ,and make one that size i have a spare set of flanges for the saw blades as well,both these blades are plated

Last edited by sand surfer (11 July 2020 09:17 am)


AT PRO international,1 pick ,1 pelican pick,shovel,sieve's,pans, 8" gold rat dream mat river sluice,crazy crusher,elbow grease and a back that scream's don't do it

#98

xcvator
Member
From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
11 July 2020 10:46 am

LoneWolf wrote:

Wow that seems to be a large bore... I think mine is only 16mm.. I will measure it tomorrow...

But no those blades wont work, I think they will chip your stone pretty easily... but I haven't tried that type...

My tile saw takes 7" blades but I can use a 8" I think... there's enough room there for it...

Is there room under (no)... as you can always cut the slot in the saw a bit longer to take the larger blade.. It has been done on mine..

Have you looked on Aussie Sapphire or Gemcuts website?

I found some for you but only a 20mm bore (gem-cuts on ebay)... think you might need to convert with bushings from 22mm down (Not possible to bush down in size) to imperial or metric to do what you want...

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/5-Thin-Lapi … SwSnZe6lG6

LW...

#99

xcvator
Member
From: Mornington Peninsula
Joined: 12 September 2016
Posts: 1,941
Member
11 July 2020 10:52 am

Dihusky wrote:
xcvator wrote:

Has anybody built their own 8"trim saw, I've got the little tile saw that 2lateagain sent me, cuts well, but the blade is quite thick and tends to shatter/chip some of the rocks so I'd like to get/make a trim saw with a very fine blade, that would make the final shaping much easier

Tile blades are totally wrong for what you're doing, too thick and slow. You can get diamond blades that are a lot thinner, they come in two types; sintered and plated, the one to go for is sintered as they last a very long time in comparison to the plated blades.

We have a tile saw currently and use a 0.5mm thick sintered blade, cuts like a hot knife through butter and easy to control the stone.

One thing to remember is diamond cuts at the rate it wants to cut, forcing a blade to cut will only damage the blade, the stone and possibly yourself, cutting is a job of patients not rush.

What size/type is your tile saw ? Patients I've got, but I'm getting a bit cheesed of with the stones chipping and breaking cry

1 user likes this post: LoneWolf

#100

Dihusky
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From: Gold Coast, QLD
Joined: 16 June 2017
Posts: 1,519
Member
11 July 2020 05:29 pm

Tile saw is from Aussie Sapphire, but basically a re-badged unit no different from a hardware shop tile saw.

https://www.aussiesapphire.com.au/7-por … ramic-glas

1594448623_lapidary-saw.jpg

Blade is 6" sintered

https://www.aussiesapphire.com.au/6-inc … cutting-st

1594448671_saw-blade.jpg

And is 0.7mm thick, one still gets a small amount of chipping but micro chips.

1594448806_blade-thickness.jpg

Last edited by Dihusky (11 July 2020 05:31 pm)

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