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#1

tailormarc
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Joined: 21 March 2017
Posts: 1,178
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23 January 2018 04:39 pm

Hey guys,
Im over here in W.A and thinking about looking for known strewn fields locations close to Perth and heading out with my trusty Mine lab Xterra 705 .
I spose you have to go all metals and dig all iron targets hey?
Anyone gone out looking and found any?

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#2

madtuna
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From: , WA
Joined: 12 December 2012
Posts: 3,149
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23 January 2018 05:52 pm

Found a few while detecting but not specifically looking for them.
Plenty of tectites though and pretty sure I've found a small impact crator.


Extremely handsome covered in a fairly thick coating of ugly
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL9zIt … KCVngVrjg?

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#3

tailormarc
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Joined: 21 March 2017
Posts: 1,178
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24 January 2018 11:16 am

madtuna wrote:

Found a few while detecting but not specifically looking for them.
Plenty of tectites though and pretty sure I've found a small impact crator.

Very cool! Any close to Perth? Found one location out Quarading way worth looking at i recon..

https://www.mindat.org/loc-12567.html

and this one...

https://www.mindat.org/loc-250665.html

Last edited by tailormarc (24 January 2018 11:21 am)

#4

madtuna
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From: , WA
Joined: 12 December 2012
Posts: 3,149
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24 January 2018 11:57 am

No idea about near Perth sorry, I'm about 1000klms away. Tectites are common on the gold fields and I'd imagine meteorites are too, just I don't have a real clue what I'm looking for.

The possible impact crator I'm keeping close to my chest for the time being. I have taken 2 geos there so far who are reasonably confidant it is.


Extremely handsome covered in a fairly thick coating of ugly
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL9zIt … KCVngVrjg?

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#5

tailormarc
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Joined: 21 March 2017
Posts: 1,178
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24 January 2018 01:05 pm

madtuna wrote:

No idea about near Perth sorry, I'm about 1000klms away. Tectites are common on the gold fields and I'd imagine meteorites are too, just I don't have a real clue what I'm looking for.

The possible impact crator I'm keeping close to my chest for the time being. I have taken 2 geos there so far who are reasonably confidant it is.

Yeah they can be tricky to know what to look for. Yep keep it on the down low wink
This vid is so good. Love to find something like this...

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#6

malri_au
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From: Adelaide & Victoria
Joined: 02 February 2018
Posts: 497
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05 February 2018 11:45 am

I've looked it up,there's some interesting impact crater databases.

the new fireball sky watch network would also be interesting to watch.

iron meteorites is easy,go dragging with neodymium magnets.

this site is the one I browsed a few years ago,it's very cool:

https://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/


Minelab SD2000|Bounty Hunter Quickdraw II|BH Pinpointer|Recirc Sluice|Pan|Noggin|Nubnutz|GM1000

#7

madtuna
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From: , WA
Joined: 12 December 2012
Posts: 3,149
Member
05 February 2018 12:07 pm

malri_au wrote:

I've looked it up,there's some interesting impact crater databases.

the new fireball sky watch network would also be interesting to watch.

iron meteorites is easy,go dragging with neodymium magnets.

this site is the one I browsed a few years ago,it's very cool:

https://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/

Actually not that easy....a magnet will pick up half of WA


Extremely handsome covered in a fairly thick coating of ugly
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL9zIt … KCVngVrjg?

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#8

malri_au
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From: Adelaide & Victoria
Joined: 02 February 2018
Posts: 497
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05 February 2018 12:14 pm

Ya but it picks up them meteors with all the rest of the crap.

you wouldn't do it unless you knew there was a strewn field or where pretty confident.


Minelab SD2000|Bounty Hunter Quickdraw II|BH Pinpointer|Recirc Sluice|Pan|Noggin|Nubnutz|GM1000

#9

meteorite indonesia
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Joined: 19 May 2018
Posts: 16
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19 May 2018 09:28 am

i have the stone like meteorite nwa 4485, weight 410 grams and i want to sell it, you can see the video by youtube title : meteorite lunar weight 410 grams.

#10

meteorite indonesia
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Joined: 19 May 2018
Posts: 16
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26 May 2018 10:30 pm

1527334205_dtlcwmmvaaawhws.jpg
1527334220_dtv0dmxu8aaemwk.jpg
1527334233_dtv0fg-u8aenmrr.jpg
1527334250_dxofieivqaaem6h.jpg

#11

grubstake
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From: Perth, WA
Joined: 20 October 2014
Posts: 2,419
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08 June 2018 11:57 pm

Here's an interesting Australian article related to the original topic:

Extraterrestrial encounters - Finding space rock that falls to earth
https://tinyurl.com/y82ollrc


Where it is, there it is.

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#12

Outback
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Joined: 22 August 2013
Posts: 1,350
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16 July 2018 01:20 am

Iv'e found two that have been confirmed , still have them .

They are hard to find , still looking for more over 10 years later sad

#13

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 2,252
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16 July 2018 01:25 am

The Geological survey in WA has a free downloadable report on some WA impact sites (written as a useful excursion guide from memory). Bunting might be one author....

This is a more recent one:

http://museum.wa.gov.au/sites/default/f … T-2012.pdf

Last edited by goldierocks (16 July 2018 01:29 am)


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

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#14

Outback
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Joined: 22 August 2013
Posts: 1,350
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16 July 2018 01:39 am

Pic of one I found that's been cut to show the inside , it's a stoney metorite that landed on earth about 1800 years ago , was sitting on the surface when I noticed it .
1531665499_005_zps43542078.jpg

Last edited by Outback (16 July 2018 01:49 am)

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#15

RedDirtDigger
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From: Central West , NSW
Joined: 29 April 2014
Posts: 282
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04 March 2019 11:53 pm

All the key strewnfields like mundrabilla, wiluna and mount egerton are reguarly raided by people. Some yanks even do trips illegally find and export illegally and then sell them on ebay. Strewnfield location maps litter the net.


Landcruiser LC79, GPZ 7000, GPX4500. Gold, Diamonds, Emeralds & meteorites.

#16

Pat Hogen
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Joined: 02 January 2018
Posts: 266
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22 January 2020 12:02 pm

Interestingly, this article appeared today -

Earth’s Oldest Asteroid Impact Found in Australia

Researchers reported on Tuesday in Nature Communications that they have pinpointed it, in Western Australia. It was caused by an impact more than 2.2 billion years ago.

The Yarrabubba impact structure, about a day’s drive northeast of Perth, isn’t much to look at today. The original crater, believed to have been roughly 40 miles in diameter, is long gone.
“There’s no topography that rises up,” said Aaron Cavosie, a planetary scientist at Curtin University in Perth and a member of the research team.
That’s because the combined effects of wind, rain, glaciation and plate tectonics have scoured several miles off the surface of the planet, effectively erasing the crater. The extent of erosion suggests that the impact structure is very, very old.

In 2014, Dr. Erickson collected roughly 200 pounds of granitic rocks from Yarrabubba. Back in the laboratory, he and his colleagues placed the rocks in water and added 120,000 volts of electricity. That jolt broke the rocks into sand-size grains. The scientists were looking for grains of zircon and monazite, tough minerals that survive for billions of years and, crucially, incorporate uranium and thorium atoms into their crystalline structure.
Uranium and thorium decay, in a steady dribble over billions of years, into lead. But the searing temperatures of an impact — thousands of degrees Fahrenheit — cause zircon and monazite to recrystallize, a process that drives out lead.

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/techands … spartanntp


Absinthe makes the heart grow fonder

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#17

Jemba
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Joined: 29 August 2016
Posts: 244
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25 February 2020 09:30 am

METEORITE CRATERS

To The Editor,

Sir—I am pleased to note that the Henbury meteorite craters are to be investigated. The Parks brothers, who were the first to take the country up as cattle runs, knew of them; also the late A. J. Breaden, who took over the runs and Todmorden. I went to Todmorden in 1916, and while fixing up tools in the blacksmith's shop noticed a slug of metallic iron. I saw a ribbon-like structure and concluded it contained nickel. I learned that it came from the blowholes at Henbury. On going to Henbury some time afterwards, I was at once satisfied as to the cause of the craters. The largest pieces of metal were some distance north-east of the craters, as though they had dropped from a molten mass falling at great speed. I concluded that probably huge masses of metal lay buried in the bottom of the craters. Charley Flemming, of Oodnadatta, forged a piece of the metal. Mr. Breaden supplied me with one of his oldest natives, who would not approach within half a mile of any crater; neither would he camp within two miles of them, and warned me not to go near to them. He told me that "Chinka waroo" (fire-devil) lived in "yabo'" (rock hole). He said his father's father had seen him, and that he came from the sun. He said that blackfellows were not on any account to stoop down and drink water from "yabo," because he would then fill them with a piece of iron. It was only because I was grey headed, he remarked, that he did not attack me in the daylight. This superstition prevails all through the Peter mann Ranges and elsewhere. Travelling south from Mount Farwell along the edge of the desert to a point about due west of Alice Springs, I saw a crater caused by a meteorite. Hornblend granite rock was shattered and indented to a shallow depth. In a low cretaceous hill south-west from Oodnadatta there is a deep puncture. East of Alice about 50 miles (I am informed by a friend) there is a large meteorite mass exposed. I have noted during travels since 1879 that all aborigines treat superstitiously anything unusual. While looking up fossils, I found it hard to keep boys near me; they would make every excuse to avoid the locality. Once I was after opal, and had travelled about 200 miles, bringing two natives with me to look after the camels. One evening I showed them some pieces of opal. They started and looked horrified. I enquired what was wrong, and they replied, "One too much lookem all about." In the morning I found them moaning, with their heads almost buried in the sand; and not one step further would they accompany me. So I was obliged to put back 200 miles to get a black brave enough to look at opal. Australia will, in the future, provide a great deal of research work for scientists. Seemingly there was, at one time, a large inland sea, and part of its edge was in the vicinity of Oodnadatta. Huge amphibica probably played about its shores.-

I am, Sir, &c., J. MAX MITCHELL, Kadina.

The Advertiser
Thu 11 Jan 1934
Page 12

https://trove.nla.gov.au/


When Injustice Becomes Law Resistance Becomes Duty.

#18

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 2,252
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25 February 2020 02:15 pm

Just for those who don't know, impact craters do not have large meteorites in their base (one American spent a fortune digging tunnels into a large impact crater in Nevada, thinking he would find an iron ore mine). In fact of the largest impact craters, only two (one being Wolf Creek) have any of the original meteorite fragments within the crater. However meteorite fragments are often found in the area outside craters, surrounding them. Sometimes after impact, the Earth's crust re-adjusts, and what was originally the floor of the crater rises, becomes a hill in its center (e.g. Mistamin Crater, where Horshoe Island in the centre is the risen floor).

1582600476_mistamin.jpg

Tektites are not thought to be of extra-terrestrial origin (not from space), but are thought to be glass formed from Earth rocks during the impact and thrown into the air.

However I guess most of you who hunt around impact sites know this - but it might inform beginners.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_i … _Australia

1582600649_impact_site_names.jpg

Last edited by goldierocks (25 February 2020 02:17 pm)


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

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#19

aaron.cavosie
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Joined: 17 June 2020
Posts: 2
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17 June 2020 08:57 pm

Hi folks,

I just stumbled across this forum, and very much enjoy the topic. I'm not a meteorite hunter, but I do hunt for impact craters for a living. I've been a Senior Research Fellow in the Space Science and Technology Centre at Curtin Uni in Perth since 2015. I can't post links yes (since I'm new to the forum), but if you google 'Curtin Cavosie' you'll find my staff page. I was one of the senior authors on the 2020 Nature paper about the Yarrabubba crater, and in 2019 we published articles providing confirmation of two impact craters: Yallallie in WA, and one called Pantasma in Nicaragua.

If any of you think you've found a bona fide impact crater, and are interested in have it examined by a planetary scientist who does this for a living, send me an email. If it ends up being legit, you'll get to share in all the glory of publishing a scientific paper with your name on it. What's involved it confirming craters? A lot of work, actually. Usually it requires at least one site visit, see what rocks are exposed, hope that ones are present that record something definitive about the impact history, and then do a lot of microscopy (transmitted light & electron microscopy) to search for and document diagnostic evidence (shocked minerals, evidence of dissolved impactor in melts, etc.). Sometimes we get lucky and find the right minerals to date the impact event, but that doesn't happen in all cases due to erosion, burial, etc.

As a side note, one of my PhD students is just finishing a review paper on the record of impact craters in Australia. Hopefully it will come out by the end of the year. I'll drop a note to this forum when its out.

Cheers, Aaron

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#20

Pat Hogen
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Joined: 02 January 2018
Posts: 266
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17 June 2020 09:25 pm

I went searching for the impact crater a little south west of Tennant Creek, NT. It was very hard to determine if what I was seeing was an actual eroded and deteriorated impact zone, except for just a faint ridge on the north western edge.


Absinthe makes the heart grow fonder

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