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#1

9od
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Joined: 12 August 2019
Posts: 13
Member
05 November 2019 12:49 am

So I have a few places in mind but I will just use one as an example.

I've been detecting below a worked reef about 80m long, which was very rich and the area has been absolutely flogged with detectors. The gully was stripped bare also.
I managed to pull 6 small bits over two trips and a nice little chunk of quartz riddled with gold. Now as I said this area has been smashed yet I also got 84 shotty pellets over the same two trips. The ground is very shallow so I realise there isn't a huge amount of dirt I can move, but enough to keep me busy for a while.

The question is...…
There is only about 20-30m from the reef to the start of the alluvial workings and the decline is roughly 15 degrees. Can much gold actually settle in this area. I know it will concentrate down further, but can we still maybe see good quantities closer to the source?

It doesn't seem that these areas were stripped very often, just test holes up to the source, yet we find many small nuggets. So is it possible for the fines to accumulate also?

I'm going to have a crack in a couple of weeks and dry blow some bulk samples and also sample the bottom separately, but interested to hear anyone else's experiences (if any) before I do.

Last edited by 9od (05 November 2019 01:20 am)

#2

Shep
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Joined: 20 January 2016
Posts: 152
Member
05 November 2019 09:17 am

Dry blowing is very worthwhile if there is gold there. Need to test pan to ensure it’s not a waste of time.
I am a big fan of my 140s and it can process dirt quicker then one person can shovel it.

Grid the area and test pan, that will tell you if it’s worthwhile. Last time I dry blowed in a flogged area was at the pine creek dump and
All I did was scrape out 4 x20L buckets from the bottom of a dry creek that runs through the middle of the goldfield and ended up with 12 grams.

7 users like this post: RM Outback, bbayjohn, grubstake, mbasko, robmoto, Goldpin Prospecting, diggit

#3

Dave63
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Joined: 23 October 2019
Posts: 40
Member
07 November 2019 11:38 pm

I am looking for a Puffer/bellows dry washer. I have only found one place in Australia that sells them. Reeds Prospecting in WA. Anyone got any ideas of other dealers in this type of dry washer.

#4

Nightjar
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From: Waikiki, WA
Joined: 26 September 2013
Posts: 1,107
Member
08 November 2019 11:17 am

9od,
The one most important with Dry BLOWING is you can almost be guaranteed gold in the jar at the end of the day. Find old dry blowings in your area, get permission from owner and go for it. Treat the old heaps, you'll be surprised what the young fellas left in the early days.
We once found an area that had been stripped and a large dry blower, probably not a bellows type and on average we retrieved an ounce of very fine gold from each heap.
Hard work with a shovel but we were younger then. tongue
Dave63, try advertising in the Kalgoorlie markets, dry blowers appear from time to time. Wise decision going for a bellows type dry blower.


Happy Hunting, Nightjar.

2 users like this post: RM Outback, Eluvial

#5

Eluvial
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Joined: 28 October 2018
Posts: 172
Member
08 November 2019 11:42 am

Are Dry Blowers illegal in QLD like the High banker or is the bellow type of Dry Blower ok? From what I've read its a no no. But thought id ask anyway as I know of some rich heaps id like to process..


Gotta do the miles to get the smiles...

#6

Shep
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Joined: 20 January 2016
Posts: 152
Member
09 November 2019 07:21 am

Eluvial wrote:

Are Dry Blowers illegal in QLD like the High banker or is the bellow type of Dry Blower ok? From what I've read its a no no. But thought id ask anyway as I know of some rich heaps id like to process..

Hand crank bellows type should be ok.

Yesterday I had to drive to darwin and back so stopped at pine creek and grabbed two buckets from a crevice on a little creek near the town dump.
As most of the gold there is little species I ran the buckets through a crusher and then dry blew it.
Less then an hours work and the dirt is from probably the most flogged area in the NT and I still got just under 13grams.

I love my dry blower

1573244412_db2dadee-7710-4c43-bb9e-e96bf97f590c.jpg

10 users like this post: grubstake, mbasko, Eluvial, goody2shoes, Heatho, Eldorado, Billy, Chewy, Goldfreak, TTKooAu

#7

mbasko
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From: Central West NSW
Joined: 27 January 2015
Posts: 4,003
Member
09 November 2019 09:31 am

Eluvial wrote:

Are Dry Blowers illegal in QLD like the High banker or is the bellow type of Dry Blower ok? From what I've read its a no no. But thought id ask anyway as I know of some rich heaps id like to process..

Motorised type dry blowers are illegal in Qld & NSW. I won't go on too much about the rules only to say IMO they are BS.
Small hobby sized equipment should be allowed but then there would always be some people pushing the boundaries or just overstepping them completely, just like now, which stuffs it for the rest of us.

We need to get the "Jack Winder" into production https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … p?id=21526
Considered Go Fund Me Outback?


Everything we use comes from mining or farming.

1 user likes this post: Eluvial

#8

Dave63
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Joined: 23 October 2019
Posts: 40
Member
09 November 2019 09:32 am

The way I read the QLD rules is:

I have to manually retrieve my pay dirt. NO Machinery.

Once in a Bucket I can process that dirt anyway I like
Bellows Dry Washer
High Banker
Pan

Cheers

Last edited by Dave63 (09 November 2019 09:38 am)

#9

mbasko
Member
From: Central West NSW
Joined: 27 January 2015
Posts: 4,003
Member
09 November 2019 10:00 am

Dave63 wrote:

The way I read the QLD rules is:

I have to manually retrieve my pay dirt. NO Machinery.

Once in a Bucket I can process that dirt anyway I like
Bellows Dry Washer
High Banker
Pan

Cheers

It's pretty much been covered before here:
https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … d=5460&p=1
In short from the Qld Fossicking Act:
"38 Use of machinery etc. prohibited.
A person fossicking under a licence must not use machinery or equipment (other than a hand tool) to fossick."
Under the Act the definition of Fossick/Fossicking includes the Collection of Fossicking Material. Fossicking Material is defined as gemstones, alluvial gold, ornamental stones, mineral specimens etc.
My understanding is that processing a bucket of dirt to retrieve Fossicking Material is considered Collection of Fossicking Material so the no machinery or equipment rule applies. Always best to make your own decisions based on info from the relevant state dept. though. You can bet their interpretation of the legislation won't match yours/ours! roll

Last edited by mbasko (09 November 2019 10:44 am)


Everything we use comes from mining or farming.

1 user likes this post: Billy

#10

Dave63
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Joined: 23 October 2019
Posts: 40
Member
09 November 2019 01:07 pm

This has been mentioned above. Talk on the forum is that this would be legal in all states.

We need to get the "Jack Winder"

https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … p?id=21526

If so how is it different to a hand powered dry washer (Bellows)

Or are we all suffering from the Fog of Interpretation

#11

mbasko
Member
From: Central West NSW
Joined: 27 January 2015
Posts: 4,003
Member
09 November 2019 03:20 pm

A hand powered dry blower should be legal too so no difference in that regard. My posts are in regards to motorised dry blowers.
Outbacks invention operates on a different type of recovery to that of a dry blower but is hand operated too. A few people on the forum have witnessed it in action & were impressed by the fine gold recovery of it. It'd be very handy around here at the moment with the lack of water around. thumbsup


Everything we use comes from mining or farming.

#12

Dave63
Member
Joined: 23 October 2019
Posts: 40
Member
09 November 2019 03:46 pm

Cool
So this one should be fine also

https://www.reedsprospecting.com.au/sho … dryblower/

Hand Crank Bellows version - Good big_smile

Add the Electric motor to drive bellows - BAD mad

The above Jack Winder would be good but, he seems to have dropped of the Forum

#13

9od
Member
Joined: 12 August 2019
Posts: 13
Member
13 November 2019 11:34 pm

Nightjar.... that sounds great but not sure there are too many dry blower heaps down here, though I could be wrong. I have been working plenty of small to medium size heaps around the gullies but only maybe avg bout a gram for a 5hr run. I'm starting to get better at identifying which ones pay better than others but am still very green and the area I go is quite diverse as far as the geology is concerned. Information on the old alluvial workings there is almost non-existent aswell.

I agree about always going home with gold when you process mullock/tailings and that's kinda why I do it, but now I'm really keen to try and use the drywasher to find deposits rather than just get someone else's scraps. Systematic bulk sampling untested ground is definitely something I want to try.

As mentioned in my first post, what I am really interested in trying is something like this:

- Large area was stripped to bedrock and reef mined out.
- Between the reef and the surfacing is approx. 20-30m of essentially undug ground (except for a few test holes up to the reef.) I THINK?
- This area has been thrashed and yet I got many, many shotty pellets, 6 little pickers and a screaming quartz specimen.
- I know heaps of little nuggies have been detected on this downslope by others.
- Basically no top soil except a scrape, and anywhere from 1 inch to 2 or 3 foot to bedrock.

My theory is that if I'm getting these little .1 and under nuggets with the sdc, and hundreds of other people have too, then does it stand to reason that there should be a butt load more just out of reach of the sdc which essentially no other detector will pick up either. Because its so shallow I figure I could process quite a good size area quickly due to basically no overburden.

Does any of that make sense or have a just totally missed the mark?

Last edited by 9od (13 November 2019 11:38 pm)

#14

G0lddigg@
Member
From: Brisbane, QLD
Joined: 03 April 2013
Posts: 4,997
Member
19 November 2019 01:11 pm

dryblowing can be super productive as has been said in old workings, but digging to wash leaving the wash out inthe open for a few weeks then running is also very rewarding. i miss dryblowing now living in SEQ its always just to damp to be productive.


*The real Gold is the Journey and the friends we make
Engineering Gold Sluices and Highbankers

1 user likes this post: TTKooAu

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