You are not logged in.

  • Register to access all forum features  

#76

RottenRon
Member
Joined: 06 February 2013
Posts: 154
Member
05 August 2014 08:32 pm

Tathradj wrote:

Mainly down the east coast of Australia. Up behind where I live Dr George is thick with them and so is a lot of places around here.
Other mongrel snake around is a Tiger snake but mainly thick a bit further south.
Yambulla my favorite hunting ground is well populated with both and being around 50Klm's from anywhere is a bit of a problem. LOL
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_death_adder

They occur in the Northern Territory as well.
About 20 years ago I was working at a powerhouse on an Aboriginal community called Ramangining, East of Darwin and not too far from the coast. My boss and I were cleaning up some dried leaves etc. and as he bent over to pick up a small pipe of leaves with his hands, he spotted the death adder slap bang in the middle of the pile yikes . It was about 20" long, and looked a hell of a lot like the dried leaves it was curled up on.
We picked it up carefully with a plastic garden rake and took it into the scrub, then came back and continued our cleanup. Needless to say, we were a little distracted after that.


If you think you can,, or you think you can't,, you're probably right.  Minelab X Terra Dual Pack, Garret ATX Deepseekr (soon), Gold Tracker MD 20, Hi-banker, sluice, enthusiasm.

#77

slowflow
Member
From: Heathcote, NSW
Joined: 05 August 2013
Posts: 724
Member
05 August 2014 09:06 pm

Snake identification
http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/anaesthes … ml#SNAKEID

Just read there are atleast 4 types of death adder in WA. http://members.iinet.net.au/~bush/ID_index.htm

Good to know what you are looking for.

http://www.avru.org/firstaid/firstaid_pib.html

Last edited by slowflow (05 August 2014 09:19 pm)

1 user likes this post: DanielMaranello

#78

Cruman
Newbie
Joined: 06 August 2014
Posts: 5
Newbie
07 August 2014 03:26 am

From my experience or should I say a mates experience snakes fangs will puncture leather boots.My mate went back to where he was born and lived the first 30 years of his life,Ayr Qld, to visit friends.At dusk,after horse riding got off his horse to open a farm gate and was hit by a taipan ,apparently not prepared to alter its direction of travel.Two lots of puncture marks were found in the boot.Luckily there were two other guys there,so he made it through but was a sick boy for a far while.

#79

RM Outback
Member
Joined: 10 March 2016
Posts: 4,484
Member
25 September 2019 06:42 pm

Nugget wrote:

Can anyone tell me if our snakes commonly strike above knee height on a standing person?

The reason I ask is that I usually wear a pair of knee high Quagmire Canvas Gaiters http://www.seatosummit.com.au/products/ … s-gaiters/ which have been great, but I'm wondering if this enough protection and if I should upgrade to full length snake-proof chaps.

Old thread but an important one down south at this time of year. Not sure though if anyone can make gaiters to hold this monster ops at bay let alone build'em tough enough to resist his fangs.

https://www.9news.com.au/national/brisb … 0771c6db93

5 users like this post: Ded Driver, Deepseeker, Gravity, goody2shoes, BigWave

#80

Deepseeker
Member
Joined: 13 August 2018
Posts: 670
Member
25 September 2019 06:51 pm

Yep, I'd say this one could sink its fangs into you anywhere it wanted regardless of how high your gaiters are. It's also another good reason to carry a couple of snake bite bandages with you while you detect. I've never seen a Red-Bellied Black snake that big before, it's a beautiful looking creature though.


Try hard not to offend. Try even harder not to be offended.

3 users like this post: RM Outback, Gravity, goody2shoes

#81

Gilly47
Member
From: Currently on Tour, QLD
Joined: 18 January 2015
Posts: 692
Member
25 September 2019 11:16 pm

that snake should be in the Guinness book of records. LITERALY

ray bomb bomb awful awful


1 wife 1 dog and a sieve. NAPFA & QSMA member,

1 user likes this post: RM Outback

#82

Ded Driver
Member
From: West of the Border, WA
Joined: 27 May 2018
Posts: 2,068
Member
25 September 2019 11:38 pm

apparently most bites from a free snake occur below the knee, with the 2nd most common on the hand or arm because a/ the person tried to catch it, or b/ they had their hand down close to the ground or in bushes.
Obviously if a snake is on a ledge, rock, branch, in a shrub etc, it could get you nearly anywhere.
If you're really worried & in a high risk area, in the USA they have 'Bob Allen Snake Chaps', shouldn't be too hard to buy some out of the USA, or find something similar.
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=Bob+ … 9414526505
These ones from Clogger here in Au are fairly high
https://clogger.com.au/clogger-snakesaf … gJgJvD_BwE
I use gaitors with polyethylene sheet in them, from Reeds Prospecting here in WA, but they only just reach the bottom of my knee. I try to avoid stepping on the blighters cool


APLA member, GPX4000, modded SD2100, XTerra705, GM1000, Whites MXT Pro, Nokta Pointer, sP01 Enhancer, Garmin GPSMAP 64S, kti PLB, a map, all sorts of coils & a cupla buckets full of hope & enthusiasm

2 users like this post: RM Outback, Deepseeker

#83

BigWave
Member
From: Melbourne
Joined: 19 January 2016
Posts: 3,556
Member
26 September 2019 05:03 am

These ones also eat browns, so keeping that population in check.


GPX-4500 & Direction Finding Daughter

#84

DykeHead
Member
From: , VIC
Joined: 27 August 2018
Posts: 69
Member
26 September 2019 08:51 am

I believe if your bitten on a limb you need to keep at least the affected limbs movement to a minimum.

"It's a myth that snake venom gets straight into your blood stream after a bite. Instead, it moves through your lymphatic system. Lymph is a fluid in your body that contains white blood cells. Unlike blood, which is pumped around your body continuously, your lymph moves when you move your limbs."

3 users like this post: robmoto, Retirement Stone, DanielMaranello

#85

Deepseeker
Member
Joined: 13 August 2018
Posts: 670
Member
26 September 2019 11:18 am

Ded Driver wrote:

apparently most bites from a free snake occur below the knee, with the 2nd most common on the hand or arm because a/ the person tried to catch it, or b/ they had their hand down close to the ground or in bushes.
Obviously if a snake is on a ledge, rock, branch, in a shrub etc, it could get you nearly anywhere.
If you're really worried & in a high risk area, in the USA they have 'Bob Allen Snake Chaps', shouldn't be too hard to buy some out of the USA, or find something similar.
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=Bob+ … 9414526505
These ones from Clogger here in Au are fairly high
https://clogger.com.au/clogger-snakesaf … gJgJvD_BwE
I use gaitors with polyethylene sheet in them, from Reeds Prospecting here in WA, but they only just reach the bottom of my knee. I try to avoid stepping on the blighters cool

So True DD, it's worth remembering too that if you are detecting in scrub that some snakes are well known to climb up in bushes or trees looking for prey (I've known of Tigers doing it in time of drought), and also if you detect gullies and creek beds you can very easily have them at head or neck level on the bank as you walk along concentrating on whats down at your feet.

Last edited by Deepseeker (26 September 2019 11:18 am)


Try hard not to offend. Try even harder not to be offended.

#86

goldierocks
Member
Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,877
Member
26 September 2019 12:11 pm

goldierocks wrote:
Colmaca wrote:

most Aussie snakes can't effectively bite through denim, loose Just makes lots of noise they run first.

Correct. The huge fangs of vipers that you see photos of, and which can penetrate through all sorts of protective gear, are snakes that do not occur in Australia (Viperidae). The eastern brown is responsible for 60% of deaths in Australia but its fangs are only 3 mm long, tiger snakes 3.5 mm - so they won't bite through anything substantial. The taipan can have fangs of 1.2 cm - but think what that looks like (hard to get much penetration through a pair of boots or chaps). Unless you are a coastal Queenslander you are unlikely to be bitten by a coastal taipan, although the inland taipan hangs around a different but still restricted area (SW Qld, northern SA, NW NSW - circling east, north and west of Lake Eyre). The odds of being seriously bitten (penetrated by fangs) from an Australian snake are very small if you are wearing some sort of protection - you don't really need truck tyres wrapped around your legs (bloody hot and awkward to wear all day in desert heat). I have fairly light protection to just below my knees, and I usually wear them working in tall grass etc along streams and in swampy areas - few snakes will bite higher than that and life is dangerous anyway - about as likely as being killed by a falling satellite. About 3000 people are bitten per year but only one or two die - more than 90% of those bitten either accidentally trod on a snake or fooled around with them (eg trying to kill them) - so tread loudly and leave them alone if possible. Main things if bitten is to try and not move around, and wrap the limb firmly but not too tightly in a roller bandage. You don't have to identify the snake with the anti-venine we have now, and by minimising movement (a good reason for not working alone) the venom will take a long time to get from your lymphatic system to your bloodstream - you would be very unlucky to have direct injection into your blood stream. Most people would survive untreated if kept still and calm for long enough - but I don't recommend it. I have been with two people when bitten - one was bitten by a huge taipan in Africa, and survived with rapid injection of anti-venine that we carried in field bags. The other was bitten by an unidentified venomous snake in the Grampians in Victoria and survived un treated (his ankle blew up like a football). Another friend in Africa was bitten by a Berg Adder and was in bed for 6 months and nearly lost a leg (got late treatment), but recovered OK. Give me Australian snakes any day over the African vipers, that rot your flesh

Last edited by goldierocks (26 September 2019 12:16 pm)


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#87

goldierocks
Member
Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,877
Member
26 September 2019 12:21 pm

Things like African taipans happily sit in the branches (no one told me for nearly a year and I just watched the ground). I find venomous Australian snakes are not great climbers, but they will lie in the sun on large tree fern fronds a metre or so above ground (counted 42 around a lake one day, with half a dozen on fern fronds).

I forgot to mention that the Common Death Adder (Australian) has average 6.2 mm fangs (still shortish) and is quite venomous, but accounts for only rare deaths (used to be 60% of deaths before the first development of anti-venine, so treatment is very desirable).

Last edited by goldierocks (26 September 2019 12:29 pm)


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

1 user likes this post: RM Outback

#88

Tathradj
Moderator
From: Tathra, NSW
Joined: 17 February 2014
Posts: 8,717
Moderator
26 September 2019 12:34 pm

The bigger variety have fangs up to 15mm long.
Like hypodermics.
And can go through leather shoes without a problem. smile


A couple of HiBankers inc. accessories, , QED, 4500, SDC2300, Gt1600,
Aldi, A Prado 4x4, A'Van Cruiseliner and a heck of a lot of determination.
Most importantly, A lot of Good Honest Friends. Maybe one day Lucky.

1 user likes this post: RM Outback

#89

Ded Driver
Member
From: West of the Border, WA
Joined: 27 May 2018
Posts: 2,068
Member
26 September 2019 01:48 pm

i just received an email reply from Clogger.com.au on their Snake Gator sizes.
The sizes listed on their website are kinda strange. Im 6ft, medium build wink & yet the sizing indicated I would need a 'small', so i enquired if the larger sizes were for a horse.
The reply i received states that they are reviewing & changing the way the sizes are given.
Apparently a 'Medium' would be my fit.
They didnt mention a size for the horse lol


APLA member, GPX4000, modded SD2100, XTerra705, GM1000, Whites MXT Pro, Nokta Pointer, sP01 Enhancer, Garmin GPSMAP 64S, kti PLB, a map, all sorts of coils & a cupla buckets full of hope & enthusiasm

2 users like this post: Deepseeker, RM Outback

#90

Gilly47
Member
From: Currently on Tour, QLD
Joined: 18 January 2015
Posts: 692
Member
26 September 2019 10:15 pm

what about light horse gaiters or a cupla pair of welders spats

ray


1 wife 1 dog and a sieve. NAPFA & QSMA member,

3 users like this post: RM Outback, Ded Driver, Tathradj

#91

Ded Driver
Member
From: West of the Border, WA
Joined: 27 May 2018
Posts: 2,068
Member
27 September 2019 12:28 am

coz Ray, my fetlocks run all the way up into my calf's lol lol lol
https://www.carters.com.au/index.cfm/it … hoe-co-16/
but these air-cooled light weight eventers boots are good
https://www.ashbree.com.au/new-premier- … gIyGvD_BwE cool

Last edited by Ded Driver (27 September 2019 12:31 am)


APLA member, GPX4000, modded SD2100, XTerra705, GM1000, Whites MXT Pro, Nokta Pointer, sP01 Enhancer, Garmin GPSMAP 64S, kti PLB, a map, all sorts of coils & a cupla buckets full of hope & enthusiasm

#92

Muk
Member
Joined: 19 June 2016
Posts: 404
Member
27 September 2019 08:39 am

If your that concerned about snakes just get some cheap gum boots and cut the sole off them put them on then you boots/shoes cheers Muk.

5 users like this post: stevewilko, RM Outback, Gunna, goody2shoes, LoneWolf

#93

manfromironbark
Member
Joined: 03 May 2019
Posts: 38
Member
27 September 2019 10:53 am

I don't know why you all want protection, just pat them on the head and say good snake...

https://www.facebook.com/paultully/vide … 712144569/
argh

#94

7.62marksman
Member
From: Nowra, NSW
Joined: 26 July 2016
Posts: 6,999
Member

Highbanker, Sluice, Trommel, Gold Monster 1000 (Khaleesi), Garrett Ace 400i (Rhaegal), Go-Find 40 (Nymeria), Non Turbo 2.8lt Hilux (Turtle), NAPFA member ----Even a broken clock is right twice a day

#95

goldierocks
Member
Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,877
Member
31 October 2019 05:24 pm

Did you see that a Western brown just killed a guy in the NT?


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#96

just starting
Member
Joined: 28 December 2018
Posts: 444
Member
31 October 2019 07:02 pm

Poor bloke. 68 years old , i think. He got help ,but it was too late.

Sorry 7.62 Marksman. I just saw your post.

Last edited by just starting (31 October 2019 07:03 pm)


If it wasn`t for bad luck , i would have no luck at all.

#97

Ded Driver
Member
From: West of the Border, WA
Joined: 27 May 2018
Posts: 2,068
Member
31 October 2019 07:48 pm

very unfortunate outcome sad


APLA member, GPX4000, modded SD2100, XTerra705, GM1000, Whites MXT Pro, Nokta Pointer, sP01 Enhancer, Garmin GPSMAP 64S, kti PLB, a map, all sorts of coils & a cupla buckets full of hope & enthusiasm

#98

StayyerAU
Member
Joined: 30 March 2019
Posts: 119
Member
10 November 2019 07:22 am

Gday

Snakes are better avoided, and for the most part they don't want to be near us either, as earlier mentioned a lot of people are bitten when they try to kill the snake as it will of course become agitated and if you are bitten it will have plenty of venom in the bite, some bites when the snake is surprised and strikes at you will be dry and contain little or no venom so wearing long pants, gators and good boots might save you finding out, wearing thongs and runners is plain stupid, and so is wearing thongs and open shoes while wandering the camp at night as contrary to popular belief snakes will and do wander around at night and it does not matter if it is hot or cold weather.

The closest I came to getting bitten was at first light on a morning when it was extremely cold, just started to detect while heading out of camp and looking down as I took a step forward I had a small snake about 600/700mm long slither between my feet, it must have come up from behind me, it was not happy about the cold I guess as it was flattened out close to the ground, in surprise I stepped back and placed my coil on top of it, not very hard but enough to encourage it to take off, after biting the coil it with the aid of a couple of rocks tossed at it nose dived under some leaf littler at the base of a bush, so I just wandered away in the other direction to avoid it, so that's how I know they can be about when its really cold as well.

In the case of snakes prevention is better than cure, use your head and protect yourself in the first place and you will probably avoid a bite.

cheers

stayyerAU

3 users like this post: mbasko, Deepseeker, Billy

#99

Deepseeker
Member
Joined: 13 August 2018
Posts: 670
Member
10 November 2019 11:45 am

So true StayyerAU. Some are Diurnal, some are Nocturnal, and some may be both depending on the weather. Some that generally are active in the day time only, then become active on warm nights and move around.


Try hard not to offend. Try even harder not to be offended.

#100

davent
Member
Joined: 01 September 2015
Posts: 2,645
Member
10 November 2019 06:09 pm

RottenRon wrote:
Tathradj wrote:

Mainly down the east coast of Australia. Up behind where I live Dr George is thick with them and so is a lot of places around here.
Other mongrel snake around is a Tiger snake but mainly thick a bit further south.
Yambulla my favorite hunting ground is well populated with both and being around 50Klm's from anywhere is a bit of a problem. LOL
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_death_adder

They occur in the Northern Territory as well.
About 20 years ago I was working at a powerhouse on an Aboriginal community called Ramangining, East of Darwin and not too far from the coast. My boss and I were cleaning up some dried leaves etc. and as he bent over to pick up a small pipe of leaves with his hands, he spotted the death adder slap bang in the middle of the pile yikes . It was about 20" long, and looked a hell of a lot like the dried leaves it was curled up on.
We picked it up carefully with a plastic garden rake and took it into the scrub, then came back and continued our cleanup. Needless to say, we were a little distracted after that.

There are big mobs of death adders up here.
I took a work crew to rake and get the Garma festival site cleaned up. Lots of death adders in thr leaf litter, mostly small ones, but the occasional big bugger.
Around the tennant creek area, they get pretty big. Also, sometimes on the roads in wet season after rain around the flood plains.


Contact Us - Privacy Policy - Terms Of Service

View Desktop Site

Top