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#1

washgravel
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Joined: 21 May 2014
Posts: 102
Member
10 September 2019 02:14 pm

I have a question in regards to the colour used for the coil housing.

Therefore is a light colour better than a darker colour for a Pulse Induction coil ?

So does white reflect heat better and black attract less ultra violet?

And does either effect the performance of the coil?

#2

Booney
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Joined: 16 October 2018
Posts: 225
Member
10 September 2019 04:01 pm

I don’t think color has anything to do with it , although heat may be a factor ,the difference in color would be marginal. Having said that I do like a good camo coil , so nobody can see where I’ve been playful

1 user likes this post: roundtuit

#3

The Big B1
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From: Sunraysia, VIC
Joined: 14 July 2018
Posts: 71
Member
10 September 2019 05:53 pm

Color will have no effect on the coils performance, visible light isn't going to penetrate the casing, I doubt any of the electronics inside the detectors are sensitive to it anyway.
With the gauge of wire used in these coils the temperature would need to be quite high before internal resistance becomes a problem, by that point the plastic would have long since melted away. fire


GPX 4500, X-Terra 705, Garrett Carrot

2 users like this post: roundtuit, Ded Driver

#4

Ded Driver
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From: West of the Border, WA
Joined: 27 May 2018
Posts: 1,806
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10 September 2019 11:50 pm

much as The Big B1 said.
when the temp gets to high 40's the swinger is going to have more problem than the coil sunny fire playful


APLA member, GPX4000, modded SD2100, XTerra705, GM1000, Whites MXT Pro, Nokta Pointer, sP01 Enhancer, Garmin GPSMAP 64S, kti PLB, a map, all sorts of coils & a cupla buckets full of hope & enthusiasm

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#5

washgravel
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Joined: 21 May 2014
Posts: 102
Member
11 September 2019 07:07 pm

Thanks so colour has no effect.

Another question is in regards to coil housing construction material such as plastics that could allow static electricity to build up under certain weather conditions and be discharged when brushing the coil against long grass, bushes & etc creating an electrical spike interference?

And would a closed-in (solid) type or open spoke type housing be more prone to static build up?

#6

Jazz
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Joined: 31 March 2019
Posts: 81
Member
11 September 2019 09:18 pm

You're grounded. Plants are grounded. Unless you run around in your 80's parachute trackies, you won't build up static electricity.

Even if you did discharge and somehow register a blip (which isn't going to happen), you'd swing over the suspect target again to realise nothing is there.

I'd be more worried about 'hot rocks' and mineralisation changes in the soil, than static electricity and the colour of your detector.

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#7

AuMan
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Joined: 16 March 2014
Posts: 133
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11 September 2019 10:21 pm

Jazz wrote:

You're grounded. Plants are grounded. Unless you run around in your 80's parachute trackies, you won't build up static electricity.

Even if you did discharge and somehow register a blip (which isn't going to happen), you'd swing over the suspect target again to realise nothing is there.

I'd be more worried about 'hot rocks' and mineralisation changes in the soil, than static electricity and the colour of your detector.

Well actually, You and the detector aren't grounded at all.
What happens, more so on warmer windy days, is you get static charge build up on the detector ground(case, shaft, coil shield) as well as your body(which is also isolated from the ground and the detector)

So, what you will notice, the day will be clear(no storms nearby) and you'll be detecting away and you get a spike like a lightening strike makes. Often you will have bumped a rock or small shrub/tuft of grass when you get this signal, but when you check back again there is nothing. Then a little while later you'll notice the same thing again.

The colour of the coil housing won't have much to do with this. It is just what happens when dry air moves past a conductor.

However, I have heard that black abs has carbon in it, this could cause a slight signal in the coil. There was something with the black coils that were released with the extreme and they never used black again.

Cheers Mick

1 user likes this post: Ded Driver

#8

The Big B1
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From: Sunraysia, VIC
Joined: 14 July 2018
Posts: 71
Member
11 September 2019 10:39 pm

I'd bet most if not all reputable brands of coils are made with ESD in mind, not to mention all coils have shielding built into them, if they didn't they would react to every bump or nearby object (ground, plants, your body) through capacitance.
This is a good tell sign that a coils shielding is faulty or detached from the coil.

Last edited by The Big B1 (11 September 2019 10:42 pm)


GPX 4500, X-Terra 705, Garrett Carrot

#9

AuMan
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Joined: 16 March 2014
Posts: 133
Member
12 September 2019 01:32 am

Of course they all have shielding, they won't work without it.
My point is that the detector body is not grounded to earth(the thing we walk on), so is able to build up charge and then at some point it discharges into ground when you brush some random rock or shrub(the gap is close enough for a discharge to occur).

Just to be clear, the detector body, coil shielding and detector electronic ground are all connected to detector ground, but the detector as a whole unit is isolated from earth(plastic coil housing, plastic feet on the detector, plastic handle), therefore in the right conditions is able to build up charge.

You will notice this more on hot dry windy days.

Cheers Mick

1 user likes this post: Ded Driver

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