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#1

Bizmark
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Joined: 30 January 2019
Posts: 27
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16 February 2019 05:20 pm

1550298046_7f029072-f3bd-4de2-b03a-60a6eee934df.jpg
1550298047_8236deeb-80ee-48f1-a094-f8d7287e85c4.jpeg

#2

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,268
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16 February 2019 05:37 pm

Tricky without knowing what the sulphide mineral was that used to be in the cavities.

It wont be sulphur.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#3

Bizmark
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Joined: 30 January 2019
Posts: 27
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16 February 2019 08:42 pm

That’s freshly cracked open the light green stuff is a mystery to me

#4

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
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16 February 2019 09:52 pm

Bizmark wrote:

That’s freshly cracked open the light green stuff is a mystery to me

Yes - even though freshly cracked open, the sulphide minerals that used to be there have weathered out leaving the cavities.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#5

Bizmark
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Joined: 30 January 2019
Posts: 27
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17 February 2019 11:38 am

Yeah ok,,am pulling this almost looks like ear wax1550363894_3728dc59-dcd9-4871-974d-5b4327b58577.jpg

#6

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,268
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17 February 2019 12:10 pm

Problem with yellow earthy looking minerals is that there are so many. Native sulphur is one, but it is relatively rare in most hard-rock mining fields in Australia. However many of the oxide minerals of elements like bismuth, molybdenite, antimony, tungsten, iron, uranium can be yellow (the "ochre" minerals). They are often soft and powdery with similar properties, and can be best separated only with a flame test.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

3 users like this post: Wishfull, LoneWolf, jethro

#7

jethro
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From: North East , VIC
Joined: 06 September 2013
Posts: 516
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17 February 2019 04:48 pm

I have found mineral similar to what you have in the photos in cavities in quartz. some lemon yellow waxy material was heavy enough to be right on the bottom of the pan mixed with the gold. I assumed that it was some form of Bismuth sulphide. The Green is maybe a Decomposition product of an Arsenic Cadmium Sulphide. Is there any gold in your sample?

#8

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,268
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17 February 2019 09:41 pm

jethro wrote:

I have found mineral similar to what you have in the photos in cavities in quartz. some lemon yellow waxy material was heavy enough to be right on the bottom of the pan mixed with the gold. I assumed that it was some form of Bismuth sulphide. The Green is maybe a Decomposition product of an Arsenic Cadmium Sulphide. Is there any gold in your sample?

Bismuth sulphide is not yellow and waxy, but more silvery and metallic:

http://webmineral.com/specimens/picshow … Gk5__ZuJPY

I am not aware of there being an arsenic cadmium sulphide.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#9

jethro
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From: North East , VIC
Joined: 06 September 2013
Posts: 516
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18 February 2019 07:47 am

Sorry my bad I should have refreshed my memory before posting could it be this OXIDE of bismuth antimony and Iron. http://webmineral.com/data/Bismutostibi … GnBybhxXIU.

#10

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,268
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18 February 2019 09:49 am

jethro wrote:

Sorry my bad I should have refreshed my memory before posting could it be this OXIDE of bismuth antimony and Iron. http://webmineral.com/data/Bismutostibi … GnBybhxXIU.

It could be so many things. Without a flame test or chemical analysis it is hard to pin down. Often remnants of the original sulphide that it is forming from is easier to identify, and the new mineral will contain metals that were in the old mineral.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#11

jethro
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From: North East , VIC
Joined: 06 September 2013
Posts: 516
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18 February 2019 06:49 pm

I have a table of results expected, for blow pipe work drawn up for the Melbourne Technical Collage. It assumes that the user knows how to carry out blow pipe work but I would think that the required equipment is very hard to come by. Is there a modern technique that will give an indication of the elements present without the cost of expensive Xray Defraction machines. About the limit of my abilities is reducing Casiterite to metallic tin using Charcoal, Bycarb soda and a mapgas torch. Or oxidizing Arsenopyrite. under a flame (small piece with good ventilation, don't try this at home kids). argh

Last edited by jethro (18 February 2019 06:57 pm)

#12

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,268
Member
19 February 2019 10:14 am

jethro wrote:

I have a table of results expected, for blow pipe work drawn up for the Melbourne Technical Collage. It assumes that the user knows how to carry out blow pipe work but I would think that the required equipment is very hard to come by. Is there a modern technique that will give an indication of the elements present without the cost of expensive Xray Defraction machines. About the limit of my abilities is reducing Casiterite to metallic tin using Charcoal, Bycarb soda and a mapgas torch. Or oxidizing Arsenopyrite. under a flame (small piece with good ventilation, don't try this at home kids). argh

Do a search for Series on identifying minerals - part 7 FLAME AND BEAD TESTS under me (goldierocks)

The requirements are simple. No doubt there are cheaper sources for platinum wire. We used to buy a short bit of wire and push it into a glass rod (as a handle) softened in a flame.

http://www.crscientific.com/platinumwire.html

http://www.crscientific.com/blowpipes.html

They also sell charcoal blocks.

How to use a blowpipe:
https://link.springer.com/referencework … 30844-X_11

Borax is readily available. However simply dropping powdered material in a candle flame can be useful.

https://www.stevespanglerscience.com/la … lame-test/

Nichrome wire can be used as an alternative for platinum wire when testing for some elements (not all) - I would be wary with nickel and chromium when determining minerals containing those elements:

https://www.sciencecompany.com/Deluxe-F … 16770.aspx

I imagine platinum-iridium wire would be as good as platinum wire, as it is very unreactive (better than nichrome wire I imagine):

https://www.labfriend.com.au/platinum-iridium-wire

On another note, those who have no testing tools for minerals might find this a good start - includes bar magnet, streak plate, hand lenses, acid bottle (for dilute hydrochloric acid - diluted 1:1 wirh water). For most hardness tests you only need your fingernail, a "gold" coin, a steel needle of tiny pocket-knife blade. and a piece of quartz.

https://www.homesciencetools.com/produc … -test-kit/

See my "Series on identifying minerals" on this site for more details.

Last edited by goldierocks (19 February 2019 10:18 am)


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#13

jethro
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From: North East , VIC
Joined: 06 September 2013
Posts: 516
Member
19 February 2019 08:54 pm

Cheers Goldierocks Ive had a read through that, great resource for those of us interested in identifying metals, metaloids, and some of the other elements. Ill be getting a couple of blowpipes at least. and maybe some platinum coated nickel wire and an alchol burner, It'll give me something to do whilst sitting around the fire up at the hut near mitta, apart from whisky appeciation. thumbsup

Last edited by jethro (19 February 2019 09:06 pm)

#14

Bizmark
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Joined: 30 January 2019
Posts: 27
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22 February 2019 07:40 pm

I have been outa serv for the wk working.. thanx for yur knowledge input.. this quartz I’m smashing open has heeeaaps of different minerals going on... jus wondering is there a way I can get them tested or snd a sample of it.... I have brought home about 3 ton of rough quartz wit mass mineralization happening in it,, it’s from a vein of quartz about 4 ft wide 25 ft high from what I can tell..

#15

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,268
Member
22 February 2019 08:04 pm

jethro wrote:

Cheers Goldierocks Ive had a read through that, great resource for those of us interested in identifying metals, metaloids, and some of the other elements. Ill be getting a couple of blowpipes at least. and maybe some platinum coated nickel wire and an alchol burner, It'll give me something to do whilst sitting around the fire up at the hut near mitta, apart from whisky appeciation. thumbsup

Lots of fun minerals to find around Mitta. Cassiterite, bismuthinite, native bismuth, stibnite, gold, rare earth minerals, silver minerals - probably the best part of Victoria for variety.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#16

Bizmark
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Joined: 30 January 2019
Posts: 27
Member
22 February 2019 08:49 pm

Haha y do I think mitta

#17

Bizmark
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Joined: 30 January 2019
Posts: 27
Member
22 February 2019 08:51 pm

Where is even mitta

#18

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,268
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22 February 2019 09:01 pm

Eskdale, Tallandoon, Mitta Mitta, Kiewa Valley......


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.


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