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#26

Outback
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Joined: 22 August 2013
Posts: 736
Member
15 April 2014 08:04 pm

Hurg wrote:

Is there any way of proving which state a meteorite has come from?

If it's not from a known fall the answer is no , I find it strange that in most States they are protected under Heritage Laws , so if one happens to fall tomorrow that's the law it comes under   yikes

#27

rsbottrill
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Joined: 27 January 2013
Posts: 5
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17 April 2014 12:14 am

Not usually, only if its a part of a known meteorite, but we would rather you kept the real location with the meteorite, else it loses scientific value. You are not likely to get raided by the Govt looking for meteorites.

#28

Outback
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Joined: 22 August 2013
Posts: 736
Member
17 April 2014 12:58 am

rsbottrill wrote:

Not usually, only if its a part of a known meteorite, but we would rather you kept the real location with the meteorite, else it loses scientific value. You are not likely to get raided by the Govt looking for meteorites.

I think you should elaborate more as I'm not clear with your rhetoric so far ?

#29

rsbottrill
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Joined: 27 January 2013
Posts: 5
Newbie
18 April 2014 07:45 pm

Pieces of meteorite from one fall can usually be analysed and matched to each other, so that may give you a location, but if its a new find you cannot tell where its from. Of course, until its analysed its just a rock (unless you see it fall).

#30

loamer
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Joined: 20 July 2013
Posts: 1,893
Member
18 April 2014 08:02 pm

From the Melbourne Museum  http://museumvictoria.com.au/discoveryc … eteorites/

Are meteorites protected?
Federal laws protect meteorites found in Australia and it is an offence to export one without a permit. In Western Australia and South Australia legislation means that meteorites are the property of the Government and must be lodged with an appropriate Museum. In other States, the finder is able to keep a meteorite.

Visitor Information
Museum Victoria has a collection of meteorites from around the world, including Australia and Victoria. Museum staff also conduct research on meteorites and provide an identification service.

#31

rsbottrill
Newbie
Joined: 27 January 2013
Posts: 5
Newbie
18 April 2014 08:29 pm

As stated earlier: in Tasmania they belong to the Govt also, and in Qld you are not allowed to fossick for them but its unclear if illegal to possess one.

#32

Outback
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Joined: 22 August 2013
Posts: 736
Member
18 April 2014 10:02 pm

Even after penetrating earth’s atmosphere and just before hitting they are called meteoroids ' so if you were lucky enough to catch one no laws apply but if you dropped the catch and then picked it up it now called a meteorite & the laws come into force .

tongue

#33

richo966
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Joined: 06 October 2013
Posts: 865
Member
18 April 2014 11:51 pm

now that would be catch of the day  wink

#34

rsbottrill
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Joined: 27 January 2013
Posts: 5
Newbie
19 April 2014 12:09 am

As with any rock, ownership is highly dependant on where you find it. The earth may be just a big rock but various people think they own most of it!

#35

silver
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Joined: 19 December 2013
Posts: 11,853
Member
19 April 2014 12:44 am

Looking like a lot depends on the angle of penetration and what sort of a catch you can come up with .
Just can't see myself getting in under a really big one and getting smashed up.
A bloke could end up wanting a whole new hobby after that.
(on the wine again)

Last edited by silver (19 April 2014 12:48 am)


What a great day ! ,... " I'll see you in the field ".

#36

Hunting the yellow
Member
From: wonderland
Joined: 20 December 2012
Posts: 1,459
Member
31 December 2015 02:40 am

ha ha speaking of meteorites read this link lol

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news … space-hit/


if its on the net every man and his dog has been there

1 user likes this post: Heatho

#37

rotor
Member
From: Gladstone, QLD
Joined: 24 May 2015
Posts: 249
Member
22 October 2017 02:38 pm

Hurg wrote:

Is there any way of proving which state a meteorite has come from?

I wouldn't think so . . . . . . . .


I don't suffer from insanity, i enjoy every minute of it ......

#38

bbrook
Member
From: warrnambool vic
Joined: 03 September 2015
Posts: 67
Member
23 October 2017 12:28 pm

Pure curiosity , does it devalue a meteorite to cut bits off and test , I mean you wouldn't hack bits of your monster nugget to give to a museum ?
thanks Brett

#39

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,079
Member
26 October 2017 08:21 am

The testing authenticates the rock as meteorite, this gives value to what was just a suspected meteorite and still had the chance of being a meteorwrong and worthless rock.
It is a lot easier to authenticate a gold nugget without having to cut a slice using hardness and SG.


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans


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