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#1

Outback
Member
Joined: 22 August 2013
Posts: 522
Member
12 March 2014 07:26 pm

This site is worth bookmarking to check when  you think you have found a meteorite .

http://www.meteorites.com.au/found.html

#2

headbut
Member
From: Sydney, NSW
Joined: 13 May 2013
Posts: 1,434
Member
12 March 2014 07:54 pm

Hey Outback , yes used that for my Black Springs find & passes every test , so it will eliminate a high percentage based on those facts alone. The decider is the nickel iron presence


Gem & Gold Walbanker /Minelab X-Terra 705 Dual pack/12v mini sluice/Determination

#3

Varts
Member
Joined: 27 August 2013
Posts: 476
Member
12 March 2014 09:02 pm

Wow meteorite ,now I have not got one of those

One would be nice


Varts........................................................................................varts...............................

#4

Heatho
Moderator
From: Sydney, NSW
Joined: 29 April 2013
Posts: 8,433
Moderator
16 March 2014 11:23 am

Might have to take the 5000 out there with me next time there for a poke around and see if there's any more, a meteorite would be cool .


Minelab GPX 5000, SDC2300, CTX3030, Pro-Find-25, patience, lot's of patience.

#5

joe
Member
Joined: 06 February 2013
Posts: 1,167
Member
16 March 2014 12:35 pm

Interesting site mate, I have found a weird rock that is not magnetic  and does not reacts to detector but very heavy. Any idea?

1394933630_image.jpg
1394933659_image.jpg
1394933688_image.jpg

#6

naildigger
Member
Joined: 15 August 2014
Posts: 19
Member
22 August 2014 03:09 pm

nice buddy, i think the scientific term for that is "biggusebony wink usrockus", its a pearler wink


diggin dirt, gotta love it

#7

AtomRat
Member
From: Katazone, VIC
Joined: 22 May 2014
Posts: 4,941
Member
23 August 2014 11:43 pm

Sorry for opening an old post here, but from what I know some meteorites contains a lot of Silicon Carbide ( SiC ). A 9 volt battery and a couple of wires to the rock should make a slight glow between the negative wire and rock, just as a LED would glow. I could also be mega wrong here, but possibly worth a try. Silicon Carbide can 'simply' be made by smelting clay (aluminum silicate) with coke (carbon) at 1600'C in a graphite crucible ( Lely process )


Wisdom is knowing how little you know

#8

goldierocks
Member
Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 241
Member
10 November 2016 06:22 pm

AtomRat wrote:

Sorry for opening an old post here, but from what I know some meteorites contains a lot of Silicon Carbide ( SiC ). A 9 volt battery and a couple of wires to the rock should make a slight glow between the negative wire and rock, just as a LED would glow. I could also be mega wrong here, but possibly worth a try. Silicon Carbide can 'simply' be made by smelting clay (aluminum silicate) with coke (carbon) at 1600'C in a graphite crucible ( Lely process )

Me too.

To me it looks like it has a texture inside that might be diagnostic, but you might not want to cut it to see. Ni_Fe meteorites (with SiC) are magnetic. Even stony meteorites would probably give a small response to a hand magnet. SPecific gravity is always the best way to start - unfortunately after that you usually need to either analyse a piece or cut it.

Have you resolved it by now?


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

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