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#1

Jasonc2861
Member
Joined: 20 May 2013
Posts: 42
Member
11 July 2013 07:38 am

Hey is it true that you aren't allowed to metal detect in national parks??think I read it hear not sure,,cheers in advance. cool


Garrett AT pro.

#2

Nugget
Member
Joined: 27 November 2012
Posts: 6,041
Member
11 July 2013 08:17 am

As a general rule, National Parks are completely off limits unless stated otherwise. For example if you take a look at the VIC Prospecting Guide http://m.dpi.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/p … -Guide.pdf you will see a number of National Parks that do allow Prospecting and Fossicking. A permit is required for these areas.

The guide also defines Prospecting as the following;
Prospecting typically involves the use of metal detectors, hand tools, pans or sluices in the search for gold, gemstones and other minerals.

Nugget.

#3

Jasonc2861
Member
Joined: 20 May 2013
Posts: 42
Member
12 July 2013 04:08 pm

Ok thanks nugget.


Garrett AT pro.

#4

Nugget
Member
Joined: 27 November 2012
Posts: 6,041
Member
12 July 2013 04:22 pm

Here's a little info about Prospecting in WA

It is important to note that gold prospecting and fossicking cannot be carried out in national parks, nature reserves, on Aboriginal land and heritage sites, within townsites or other classified areas such as cemeteries. You must seek permission from the landowner to enter private property, such as farmland.

Source: http://www.australiasgoldenoutback.com/ … fossicking

Nugget.

#5

Jasonc2861
Member
Joined: 20 May 2013
Posts: 42
Member
14 July 2013 03:03 pm

Nugget wrote:

Here's a little info about Prospecting in WA

It is important to note that gold prospecting and fossicking cannot be carried out in national parks, nature reserves, on Aboriginal land and heritage sites, within townsites or other classified areas such as cemeteries. You must seek permission from the landowner to enter private property, such as farmland.

Source: http://www.australiasgoldenoutback.com/ … fossicking

Nugget.

Cheers nugget that was going to be my next question.! smile


Garrett AT pro.

#6

gadgetman45
Member
Joined: 12 June 2013
Posts: 314
Member
14 July 2013 08:25 pm

Sure are spoilsports in WA, about the only thing left is the beach


Ain't life great.

#7

Diggerdude
Banned
Joined: 23 March 2013
Posts: 810
Banned
14 July 2013 08:49 pm

Your WA miners right gives you the right to detect on all crown land, which is nearly everywhere as all pastoral leases are considered crown land.  You dont even need the pastoral lease holders consent, but you are meant to give them  curtesy call to let them know what your doing.  Your miners right also gives you the right to camp on there land, as long as you don't interfere with stock, water supplies etc.  Definatley not spoilsports, by far the best spot in Australia for detecting.

DD

#8

Jasonc2861
Member
Joined: 20 May 2013
Posts: 42
Member
14 July 2013 09:49 pm

Sweet guys!!man I'm getting excited,,ordering a garret pro this week!!yeeeew!going to Order it from detect a den from this forum,can get cheaper on flea bay,but getting from overseas wouldn't be good for returning,troubles etc,plus I like spending my hard earned cash in Australia!!cheers fellas again.some great info from a great forum! smile


Garrett AT pro.

#9

gadgetman45
Member
Joined: 12 June 2013
Posts: 314
Member
29 July 2013 10:08 pm

Diggerdude wrote:

Your WA miners right gives you the right to detect on all crown land, which is nearly everywhere as all pastoral leases are considered crown land.  You dont even need the pastoral lease holders consent, but you are meant to give them  curtesy call to let them know what your doing.  Your miners right also gives you the right to camp on there land, as long as you don't interfere with stock, water supplies etc.  Definatley not spoilsports, by far the best spot in Australia for detecting.

DD

Prospecting - The Right Way
Unauthorised Prospecting is Illegal
Unauthorised gold prospecting is illegal and carries a fine of up to $10,000. Any gold found by a person
convicted of unauthorised prospecting will be confiscated. A liability also exists to rehabilitate any
damage caused to the land and to pay compensation for any loss caused.
Before you begin prospecting - and this includes using metal detectors - contact the Mining Registrar for
the area to find out whether your area of interest is open for prospecting.
A Miner's Right is required. Plans showing mineral fields and mining tenements are available at the
Mining Registrar's office for viewing and purchase.
What Can I Do?
Miner's Right holders can take up to: 20 kg of rock, ore or minerals at any one time.
Prospecting may be done only with hand held tools or metal detectors.
Where Can I Prospect?
You may prospect on:-
• unoccupied Crown land;
• pastoral leases - provided prior notice is given to the pastoralist;
• mining and exploration tenements - provided you have the written permission of the tenement
holder.
What is Crown Land?
For the purposes of the Mining Act, Crown Land includes land which has not been set aside for any
purpose, pastoral leases and common reserves.
National parks, nature reserves, townsites, other classified reserves and private property are excluded.
Prospecting on Pastoral Leases
If you plan to prospect on a pastoral lease, notify the pastoralist by telephone, in person or in writing
before beginning.
In addition, permission must be obtained (pastoralist or private landowner as the case may be) to
prospect within 100 metres of land that is:-
• used as a yard, stockyard, garden or cultivated field;
• an airstrip;
• residential land where there is a house or substantial building;
• within 400 metres of a pastoral dam, well or bore.
Prospecting on Mining Tenements
To prospect on a mining tenement you must have the tenement holder's permission. Information on
tenement ownership can be obtained from the Department's offices.
No Prospecting on Burial Grounds or Cemeteries
Burial grounds and cemeteries are protected under the Mining Act 1978. No prospecting is allowed
within 100 metres of a burial ground or cemetery.
Aboriginal Sites and Heritage Sites are Protected and Must Not Be Interfered With.
Damage to a site under the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1980 carries a penalty of up to $2,000 and one year
imprisonment and under the Heritage of Western Australia Act 1990 a fine of up to $10,000 and two
years imprisonment.
Environmental Responsibilities
Care must be taken at all times to ensure minimal disturbance to the land when prospecting or
fossicking. All holes must be filled in and no refuse left.


Ain't life great.

#10

Panny McGee
Member
Joined: 26 July 2019
Posts: 54
Member
10 September 2019 12:58 pm

Nugget wrote:

As a general rule, National Parks are completely off limits unless stated otherwise. For example if you take a look at the VIC Prospecting Guide http://m.dpi.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/p … -Guide.pdf you will see a number of National Parks that do allow Prospecting and Fossicking. A permit is required for these areas.

The guide also defines Prospecting as the following;
Prospecting typically involves the use of metal detectors, hand tools, pans or sluices in the search for gold, gemstones and other minerals.

Nugget.

Hi Nugget, do our miners rights count as permits or is that something else? Thanks for all the info, appreciate it heaps!


One half of a crazy couple who are documenting our new and exciting journey into prospecting

#11

MegsyB007
Member
Joined: 10 September 2018
Posts: 1,305
Member
10 September 2019 03:47 pm

Hi Panny,
Victoria only has miner's rights for prospecting. They were talking about WA, is which is different - they require permits too.

Cheers,
Megsy


The Australian bush - love it - take care of it.

2 users like this post: RM Outback, Panny McGee

#12

Panny McGee
Member
Joined: 26 July 2019
Posts: 54
Member
11 September 2019 10:43 am

Thanks for the clarification Megsy smile


One half of a crazy couple who are documenting our new and exciting journey into prospecting


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