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#1

Hatter70
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Joined: 16 July 2014
Posts: 27
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15 September 2014 09:48 pm

Hello just wondering if anyone knows a safe way to clean specimens which have quartz and ironstone infusd with the gold without having to dolly it up to remove the quartz and ironstone.

Last edited by Hatter70 (15 September 2014 10:22 pm)

#2

AtomRat
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From: Katazone, VIC
Joined: 22 May 2014
Posts: 5,066
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21 September 2014 10:50 am

Hi Hatter, sorry you had not a reply, it must have skipped through the forum without being noticed!

The only way I know of how to completely remove gold from a specimen is through hydrofluoric acid, and it is not a nice acid at all. I would only recommend it if you know chemical safety and neutralizing. Anything with 'fluoro' in it can be deadly, it soaks into the skin and stays in your system. I do not think there is a 'safe way'.

The acid will eat all of the quartz away, leaving the gold behind. I can help you with this info, but theres massive risks to your health if something goes wrong.

Attempt selling specimens on ebay as many buy them. If you just want the gold, them smash it or extract it in any way you feel.

Last edited by AtomRat (21 September 2014 10:59 am)


Wisdom is knowing how little you know

#3

XIV
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Joined: 08 June 2013
Posts: 1,054
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21 September 2014 12:42 pm

Leaving it in albrite will slowly break down the quartz but it takes a while (months)
But at least it is a lot safer than hydrofluoric acid


One can never be wrong at doing the right thing.

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#4

Westaus
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Joined: 09 March 2014
Posts: 489
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21 September 2014 01:01 pm

Will diluted Hydrochloric acid work ? I know it already comes diluted but I thought I read somewhere a ~10% solution would eat away at most things. I have a couple of small specks I wouldn't mind cleaning/brightening up. Thanks

#5

Hatter70
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Joined: 16 July 2014
Posts: 27
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21 September 2014 04:24 pm

Hello and thank you for your replys. I ended up asking somebody About this situation and at the moment I'm using pool acid which seems to be doing the trick at cleaning them. But one should take care when handling any form of chemicals and adhere to all the warning labels on the products.

#6

AtomRat
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From: Katazone, VIC
Joined: 22 May 2014
Posts: 5,066
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21 September 2014 11:43 pm

I found a great link here that explains what hydrochloric, hydrofluoric and alibright ( which has 1% hydrofluoric ) if anyone wants to check it out: http://www.gold-prospecting-wa.com/cleaning-gold.html

Working with Hydrofluoric Acid: http://www.commerce.wa.gov.au/publicati … uoric-acid

Also found a comment elsewhere by Oneday69:
when cleaning species I use a solution of 10% hydrofluric acid with all the neccessary parafinaliar to boot.
If you dont take precaution with this acid then DO NOT USE IT.
The quartz comes out white and the gold is yellow. Full strength acid will devour the rock to liquid.

Last edited by AtomRat (21 September 2014 11:48 pm)


Wisdom is knowing how little you know

1 user likes this post: paddy

#7

22shells
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Joined: 11 September 2014
Posts: 51
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17 March 2015 04:57 pm

Say if you found a lump of quartz that was giving a strong signal with a detector, but no visible gold showing, does anyone know a reputable lab that you could send it to for cleaning with hydroflouric acid to get the quartz off? Has anyone ever done this? Done a bit of research and it just seems like this acid is too dangerous.

1 user likes this post: paddy

#8

mbasko
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From: Central West NSW
Joined: 27 January 2015
Posts: 2,631
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17 March 2015 05:42 pm

How big a piece are you talking?
I have found brick size bits but I just wrap them in rag & break up with a hammer. You don't have to whale into it just some stern taps usually does it. Being quartz with gold in it there will probably be ironstone or other intrusions + natural faults that will break open fairly easily. I find a lot of the time it will break up nicely right where the gold is but you do get the odd stubborn bit. lol Pass the bits over you coil again & discard the bits that don't signal. Repeat until you can see gold then put in brickies acid, alibrite or just keep as specimens. With careful tapping you can break/chip away quartz in key spots to reveal the gold too once the bits are smaller. If you not concerned with how it looks but just want the gold content you can dolly it up once its small enough for a dolly pot.
If really keen you could also dolly up the other bits & pan any gold off. Lot of work for little return though.


Everything we use comes from mining or farming.

#9

22shells
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Joined: 11 September 2014
Posts: 51
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17 March 2015 07:35 pm

Thanks mbasko. Nowhere near brick size, about 2.5"x 2"x an inch thick. Cracking it up is the other option, I'm sure it would break up easily but I don't want to wreck it if there's something good inside. Might look really nice if done with acid? Just thought I'd see what everyone else does. Cheers.

#10

Wally69
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From: Sydney
Joined: 13 December 2013
Posts: 2,305
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17 March 2015 08:16 pm

Before brick acid
1426583784_image.jpg
and after repeated soaking, the acid penetrated the joints and blocks of Quartz can be prized away. The gold is strong and follows the cracks, so if it is hiding in there you should be able to find it and hopefully produce something you can show off. big_smile
1426583822_image.jpg
Ironstone will dissolve, if the signal disappears and you see no yellow, bad luck sad

Last edited by Wally69 (17 March 2015 08:17 pm)

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#11

22shells
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Joined: 11 September 2014
Posts: 51
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17 March 2015 08:27 pm

Thanks Wally, about the same size but mine is white quartz. By brick acid I assume you mean hydrochloric acid. I've found it does a good job on ironstone, but heard it doesn't get quartz. Guess it can't really hurt to give hydrochloric acid a go? Got a good felling there's something in it but if not well yeah, bad luck! smile

#12

Wally69
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From: Sydney
Joined: 13 December 2013
Posts: 2,305
Member
17 March 2015 08:57 pm

Yes mate, hydrochloric acid.

My success was due to cracks in the Quartz which debonded following soaking and some iron oxides around some of the gold that was able to be scrubbed away with a toothbrush once the acid had reacted with it.

If it was uncracked I imagine it would have soaked for a month of Sundays with little reduction in size.

Got a before photo ? It would be good to gauge your efforts on whiter Quartz.

#13

22shells
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Joined: 11 September 2014
Posts: 51
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17 March 2015 09:41 pm

Before photo, plenty of cracks.1426588860_p3170874.jpg

#14

mbasko
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From: Central West NSW
Joined: 27 January 2015
Posts: 2,631
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17 March 2015 09:43 pm

Give it a tap lol


Everything we use comes from mining or farming.

1 user likes this post: grubstake

#15

22shells
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Joined: 11 September 2014
Posts: 51
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31 March 2015 05:28 pm

Before I give it a soak and a tap, just for fun I thought I'd try and get an idea of how much gold is in it. Using the formula (wet weight x 3.1)-(dry weight x 1.9) = gold weight. Came up with 3.36 grams. A different method gave 4.17 grams. Obviously there are a few variables such as the specific gravity of quartz and if there are any impurities in it, so it's only an estimate.

#16

Wally69
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From: Sydney
Joined: 13 December 2013
Posts: 2,305
Member
31 March 2015 07:10 pm

It should yeild a spectacular result if that is the case.

A little gold goes a long way when weaved through host rock.

Soak....soak....soak...soak.....soak; hope that is enough peer group pressure to get the ball rolling.

1 user likes this post: mbasko

#17

22shells
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Joined: 11 September 2014
Posts: 51
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14 April 2015 06:02 pm

Couple weeks in acid, couple taps with a hammer and chisel.1428994848_p4140882.jpg

2 users like this post: Monty, paddy

#18

KellyJMorrin
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From: Perth, WA
Joined: 21 April 2015
Posts: 11
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07 May 2015 11:21 pm

Thanks for that link Was very helpful!


Home is not where you live but where they understand you.

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