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#1

HeadsUp
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From: Sydney, NSW
Joined: 17 April 2013
Posts: 2,961
Member
06 January 2014 11:35 am

This is a product now endorsed by rescue and medical personnel for snakebite , old crepe bandages are sometimes ineffective , if you read the article in full you will see these new bandages have a pressure indicator in the fabric which tells you if they are too loose or too tight.

and by the way , these guys also recommend not trying to walk out after a snakebite , just hit your EPIRB , bandage the leg / arm tightly and sit down in a cool place to slow down your metabolism.

see full article and supplier names   http://bsar.org/setopress

Setopress bandages for snakebite and sprains

As Australian snake venom is carried in the lymphatic system the first aid treatment is to use a pressure bandage to wrap the bitten limb from fingers to armpit or toes to groin.  Imobilise the limb, and transport the patient to care.  Do not allow them to walk out.

Many of us carry a crepe bandage, or even better, an elastic Ace bandage to do this.  However on the Training Weekend, many members were a little surprised when they attempted to use these to apply first aid.  The crepe bandages were essentially useless.  Even with two of the heavier elastic bandages, it was impossible to wrap higher than just above the knee.


The bandage sometimes started to slip off straight away, and if it stayed up there was no way to tell if it was firm enough or too tight.  (Blue toes or decreased venous return indicate that it is too tight, but it is then necessary to unwrap the bandage and start again, allowing a surge of venom into the body.)

A bandage that is designed to regulate venous drainage was much more effective.  The Setopress Bandage which was demonstrated has a number of advantages.  Primarily it is wider (10cm) and longer (3.5M) than most crepe or elastic bandages.  This will allow a single bandage to reach the knee or armpit, and two to reach the groin.

To regulate the tightness (and therefore effective pressure) the bandage has a continuous series of green and brown rectangles printed along it's length. As the bandage is stretched, the green rectangles become squares. Increase the tension, and the brown rectangles become squares.  At this tension lymphatic return is minimised, controlling flow of venom to the body.

The brown indicators are the ones you should use for treating a snakebite. When the brown indicators become squares (the maximum pressure) lymphatic return should be minimised reducing the circulation of any venom.
The squares are also offset slightly so if you cover the squares with each wrap of the bandage you should get the right amount of overlap.


On a mission to rescue as many gold nuggets as i can before those poor souls get washed out to sea . GPX5000 smilemaker , self built highbanker and enthusiastic shovel

10 users like this post: kleinman98, Heatho, Marked, Jinx, WalnLiz, Nugget, Prospector B, Beagleboy, jimnyjerry, mbasko

#2

BumbleB
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Joined: 05 June 2013
Posts: 140
Member
06 January 2014 11:45 am

Good stuff Headsup.
I'll be getting a couple of them for the first aid kit for sure.


Minelab GPX5000. Energy flows where attention goes, so focus on the good things you want..........GOLD GOLD GOLD!

#3

Teemore
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From: Melton West, VIC
Joined: 18 September 2013
Posts: 1,124
Member
06 January 2014 07:01 pm

Thanks for posting, will follow up to get one for the kit.
Cheers Tom


If you don't stand for something ..... You'll fall for anything !!
To be old and wise you must first be young and foolish.

#4

Nugget
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Joined: 27 November 2012
Posts: 6,030
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06 January 2014 07:06 pm

Snake bite treatment is something I really need to study up on. Sure I've done a few first aid courses over the years but my brain is like a sieve and needs topping up every so often lol. Your post is most useful HU so thank you.

#5

richo966
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Joined: 06 October 2013
Posts: 865
Member
06 January 2014 07:44 pm

I have done 4 first aid courses over the years but you need to do it once a year to keep up to date on the new methods I always learn some thing new when I do the course when the chance come to do the course I jump at it  smile

#6

HeadsUp
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From: Sydney, NSW
Joined: 17 April 2013
Posts: 2,961
Member
06 January 2014 09:22 pm

Setopress application guide below is for use with leg ulcers  ( yuk )  ,  use the same wrapping technique for snakebites except tighter , you want enough bandage  tension so you see brown squares on the fabric.

easy to remember , if you get bitten by a snake you would be near crapping yourself  so just think brown squares . lol

( the shape and colour changes for different tension / pressure )

brown squares remember !

and these bandages are reusable , so you can practice a couple of times at home

ps , the same technique is used for funnelweb spider bites  , but not for redbacks

https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … _guide.pdf

Last edited by HeadsUp (06 January 2014 09:27 pm)


On a mission to rescue as many gold nuggets as i can before those poor souls get washed out to sea . GPX5000 smilemaker , self built highbanker and enthusiastic shovel

#7

HeadsUp
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From: Sydney, NSW
Joined: 17 April 2013
Posts: 2,961
Member
06 January 2014 09:26 pm

Nugget wrote:

Snake bite treatment is something I really need to study up on. Sure I've done a few first aid courses over the years but my brain is like a sieve and needs topping up every so often lol. Your post is most useful HU so thank you.

yeah i do the St Johns course every few years but its a bit brain numbing if you dont practice using it

DRABC is easy to remember though


On a mission to rescue as many gold nuggets as i can before those poor souls get washed out to sea . GPX5000 smilemaker , self built highbanker and enthusiastic shovel

#8

TenOunce Tone
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From: Cairns, QLD
Joined: 18 March 2013
Posts: 1,382
Member
06 January 2014 10:04 pm

Great post Headsup. Lets hope noone needs to use them ever.. Might be an idea for a group buy? I go to a remote area and would be up for a couple of these

Cheers, Tone


One man, One pan, One goal!

#9

condor22
Member
From: Adelaide, SA
Joined: 16 December 2013
Posts: 1,430
Member
07 January 2014 11:39 am

mmmm, Heads Up, not sure when you last did a refresher, but St John have changed since I last did CPR.
It's now DRSABCD

See attached pic

1389054500_drsabcd.png

Anyone can Google Snake Bite Treatment, try to look at the St John site if any. http://stjohn.org.au/assets/uploads/fac … kebite.pdf

5 Simple steps - 
Don't wash the bite area
Apply Pressure bandage start at the bite work all the way up the limb and back down if enough bandages
Lie down don't move
Re assure the victim
Send for or get help

Of course, if you are out there by yourself a PLB is a must. I'm in the process of buying one.
http://www.ja-gps.com.au/GME/mt410g-plb/ I reckon my life is well worth a little over $300, because as things stand, I will be out there on my own more often than not.

1 user likes this post: HeadsUp

#10

condor22
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From: Adelaide, SA
Joined: 16 December 2013
Posts: 1,430
Member
07 January 2014 11:42 am

Oh and I will be getting a couple of the Setopress bandages. Does anyone know if they are available in store in SA?
Otherwise I'll internet order.

#11

HeadsUp
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From: Sydney, NSW
Joined: 17 April 2013
Posts: 2,961
Member
07 January 2014 12:42 pm

email the manufacturer and ask her for a distributor list for your area

Maureene.Fries@molnlycke.com


On a mission to rescue as many gold nuggets as i can before those poor souls get washed out to sea . GPX5000 smilemaker , self built highbanker and enthusiastic shovel

#12

jimnyjerry
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From: Blue Mts
Joined: 30 December 2012
Posts: 262
Member
07 January 2014 02:38 pm

Great post Headsup  smile   Will have to chase up one of those bandages.


I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days attack me at once.

#13

HeadsUp
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From: Sydney, NSW
Joined: 17 April 2013
Posts: 2,961
Member
07 January 2014 03:47 pm

jimnyjerry wrote:

Great post Headsup  smile   Will have to chase up one of those bandages.

probably use 2

one will go up to the knee but they recommend going up to the groin so it would take two . depends how skinny the persons legs is of course

hope i am never out with the incredible hulk on snakebiting day . that guy would be expensive

imagine the arguments if two people got bitten by the one snake and you only had two bandages ?


On a mission to rescue as many gold nuggets as i can before those poor souls get washed out to sea . GPX5000 smilemaker , self built highbanker and enthusiastic shovel

#14

mbasko
Guest
Guest
07 January 2014 04:17 pm

http://nswfirstaid.com.au/products-page … -bite-kit/
You can also get heavy duty compression bandages in other brands for a lot less than the Setopress ones, although they don't have the telltale squares which are a great idea. There are 15cm x 4m ones out there for about $6 each or you can get a neat little kit like the one above for $15 which includes 3 compression bandages. I have a similar made up snake kit in my harness + provision for snake bite in my main first aid kit in the ute. As a minimum I keep 3 x 10cmx3.5m heavy duty compression bandages in both.

1 user likes this post: HeadsUp

#15

casper
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From: Boonwurrung country, VIC
Joined: 12 May 2013
Posts: 1,275
Member
07 January 2014 04:22 pm

I received a tip from my paramedic brother before my last trip to the 'creek' and that was to carry a permanent marker with your bandage and use it circle the bite wound on the skin and again on the outside of the constrictive bandage wrap so the treating medicos can treat the bite area and immoblised limb before removing the bandage. This is critically important if the limb has been wrapped for an extended period of time. Constrictive bandages should only be removed by medical personal

casper

Last edited by casper (07 January 2014 04:24 pm)


" Luck happens when Preparation meets Opportunity " PMAV #M3394

1 user likes this post: HeadsUp

#16

HeadsUp
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From: Sydney, NSW
Joined: 17 April 2013
Posts: 2,961
Member
07 January 2014 04:37 pm

casper wrote:

I received a tip from my paramedic brother before my last trip to the 'creek' and that was to carry a permanent marker with your bandage and use it circle the bite wound on the skin and again on the outside of the constrictive bandage wrap so the treating medicos can treat the bite area and immoblised limb before removing the bandage. This is critically important if the limb has been wrapped for an extended period of time. Constrictive bandages should only be removed by medical personal

casper

the marker idea is good in case youre off the planet by the time they get to you .

not loosening or removing the bandage is a good idea too coz the toxins released can overwhelm the person in a deadening kind of way  , leave it to the medical experts

if your toes start going purple it usually means a bandage is too tight , but that shouldnt happen with the setopress ones


On a mission to rescue as many gold nuggets as i can before those poor souls get washed out to sea . GPX5000 smilemaker , self built highbanker and enthusiastic shovel

#17

mbasko
Guest
Guest
07 January 2014 04:52 pm

casper wrote:

I received a tip from my paramedic brother before my last trip to the 'creek' and that was to carry a permanent marker with your bandage and use it circle the bite wound on the skin and again on the outside of the constrictive bandage wrap so the treating medicos can treat the bite area and immoblised limb before removing the bandage. This is critically important if the limb has been wrapped for an extended period of time. Constrictive bandages should only be removed by medical personal

casper

Marking the area & using a non adherant pad over the bite area also allows the medical people to test the area + dressings/bandages for traces of venom to correctly identify the snake & administer the correct anti venom if required.  The fact is the majority of bites don't actually envenomate & don't require anti venom but all bites have to be treated as envenomating.

Last edited by mbasko (07 January 2014 04:53 pm)

1 user likes this post: casper

#18

casper
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From: Boonwurrung country, VIC
Joined: 12 May 2013
Posts: 1,275
Member
07 January 2014 04:59 pm

The marker is recommended.. saves the medicos valuable time and also assists in the finding of any residual venom that may be on the skin surface which can aid in identification of the snake and target the treatment.

casper


" Luck happens when Preparation meets Opportunity " PMAV #M3394

#19

casper
Member
From: Boonwurrung country, VIC
Joined: 12 May 2013
Posts: 1,275
Member
07 January 2014 05:02 pm

mbasko wrote:
casper wrote:

I received a tip from my paramedic brother before my last trip to the 'creek' and that was to carry a permanent marker with your bandage and use it circle the bite wound on the skin and again on the outside of the constrictive bandage wrap so the treating medicos can treat the bite area and immoblised limb before removing the bandage. This is critically important if the limb has been wrapped for an extended period of time. Constrictive bandages should only be removed by medical personal

casper

Marking the area & using a non adherant pad over the bite area also allows the medical people to test the area + dressings/bandages for traces of venom to correctly identify the snake & administer the correct anti venom if required.  The fact is the majority of bites don't actually envenomate & don't require anti venom but all bites have to be treated as envenomating.

Thanks mbasko - we cross posted  big_smile

casper


" Luck happens when Preparation meets Opportunity " PMAV #M3394

#20

HeadsUp
Member
From: Sydney, NSW
Joined: 17 April 2013
Posts: 2,961
Member
07 January 2014 05:12 pm

mbasko wrote:

http://nswfirstaid.com.au/products-page … -bite-kit/
You can also get heavy duty compression bandages in other brands for a lot less than the Setopress ones, although they don't have the telltale squares which are a great idea. There are 15cm x 4m ones out there for about $6 each or you can get a neat little kit like the one above for $15 which includes 3 compression bandages. I have a similar made up snake kit in my harness + provision for snake bite in my main first aid kit in the ute. As a minimum I keep 3 x 10cmx3.5m heavy duty compression bandages in both.

somebody was selling a "snakebite kit" on ebay a while back but i didnt see them listed for a while , i think they were only ordinary crepe bandages though  hmm

the kit you linked to above is very good value . but i ordered the setopress ones so i know i have the right tension  , kind of the " snakebite for dummies kit"   ops


On a mission to rescue as many gold nuggets as i can before those poor souls get washed out to sea . GPX5000 smilemaker , self built highbanker and enthusiastic shovel

#21

mbasko
Guest
Guest
07 January 2014 05:33 pm

Yeah I really like the idea of those Setopress bandages but added the other for options if anyone balks at the price. I may upgrade to them if I need to get some more but I'm confident in using the others until I do. (I do yearly refresher training in Advanced Resuscitation & Life Support as well as 3 yearly Occupational/Manage First Aid in the Workplace & due to our remote location cover snake bite fairly well. We even have a "pet" red belly that is sighted during summer near our bath house)
At the end of the day I would use a t-shirt etc. if I had to - anything handy would be better than nothing.
Casper - its all good info & anything that can save time in remote area type response is very handy. Something as simple as a texta mark can be a big help once the pros take over.

#22

condor22
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From: Adelaide, SA
Joined: 16 December 2013
Posts: 1,430
Member
08 January 2014 12:36 am

FYI if you are in SA. I emailed the distributor Maureene, she supplied the following 2 contacts for SA

Atlas Health Care – 08 8177 1600
Independence Australia (Nailsworth)  - 1300 788 855

I did my first 1st Aid course in 1967 and have done at least 25 refreshers, but I would stilll not be too sure about the correct tension of the bandage, more so if applying one to myself. So the Setopress is ideal and I reckon my life is worth a bit more than $32. Especially when I spent nearly $7,000 to go out "there" in the first place.

Kinda makes saving 20 bucks seem a little petty, smile .

#23

HeadsUp
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From: Sydney, NSW
Joined: 17 April 2013
Posts: 2,961
Member
08 January 2014 01:00 am

condor22 wrote:

FYI if you are in SA. I emailed the distributor Maureene, she supplied the following 2 contacts for SA

Atlas Health Care – 08 8177 1600
Independence Australia (Nailsworth)  - 1300 788 855

I did my first 1st Aid course in 1967 and have done at least 25 refreshers, but I would stilll not be too sure about the correct tension of the bandage, more so if applying one to myself. So the Setopress is ideal and I reckon my life is worth a bit more than $32. Especially when I spent nearly $7,000 to go out "there" in the first place.

Kinda makes saving 20 bucks seem a little petty, smile .

If you have a backup safety plan , you can go anywhere , instead of avoiding detecting a thick patch of bush because you have seen snakes there a few times , you can strap on your snake gaiters , stick your Epirb and bandages in your pack and go yonder ....... " with due care"


On a mission to rescue as many gold nuggets as i can before those poor souls get washed out to sea . GPX5000 smilemaker , self built highbanker and enthusiastic shovel

#24

Village
Banned
Joined: 11 December 2013
Posts: 243
Banned
08 January 2014 05:52 am

Just a couple of key points you may or may not know.

Compression bandages should be applied from the point on the limb closests to the heart and worked down away pass the bite.

For you detectorists the optimal place to carry the same would be taped to your harness, on the vertical support just down off the shoulder, and this should be done on the non predominat side. Use duck tape, it tears across the width with ease.

PLB( epripb, and as a land based user you would be better served with a PLB) when you register your device, remember that on activation, AMSA will call the next kin straight away during the scramble, first to check it's not an accidental activation and two to notify. If your next kin, may not take such news easy, put down a next of kin, who would be able to notify your partner in person.

In the field, UHF channel 5 is the emergency channel, it is 24 hour monitored and you would be surprised on the greater range of coverage. Most uhf's now come with a monitor function, what ever channel your on, set you radio to monitor both that and channel 5. You may save someone's life, if they can' t reach the operator you may be able to relay. Also remember that you should be carrying a 5 watt radio too, be carefull be sell 1 watt radios.


In Pursuit of Perfection

#25

mbasko
Guest
Guest
08 January 2014 08:42 am

The "pressure-immobilisation" technique is currently recommended by the Australian Resuscitation Council, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists.

Village wrote:

Just a couple of key points you may or may not know.

Compression bandages should be applied from the point on the limb closests to the heart and worked down away pass the bite.

The new way of thinking is to start at the extremities i.e. fingers or toes & work your way up the limb. Include the fingers or toes also to prevent movement.

https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … july11.pdf

https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … -aug11.pdf

1 user likes this post: HeadsUp

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