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#26

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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30 January 2018 11:10 am

LoneWolf wrote:

thumbsup Pic 1 looks like a solid form of Pyrite... But I don't think Pyrite is Magnetic.... Have you tried a streak test?..
Try some of these...

https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … p?id=24758

LW.....

Doesn't look like pyrite to me but photos are not clear (and correct, pyrite is not magnetic but pyrrhotite is). Try going to "Series on identifying minerals" and list as many properties as you can and it makes it easier to answer (otherwise people are guessing)


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

2 users like this post: LoneWolf, roddosnow

#27

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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30 January 2018 11:12 am

Shaza1 wrote:
LoneWolf wrote:

Quartz I think Shaza... Topaz feels 'cool' if you put it on your lips compared to Quartz...... smile Thank-you for posting in the Correct area.... thumbsup

LW....

Thanks LW,
I took your advice but kinda hard to get correct temp when it’s 45c out here but surprisingly I took a few from my pile and they where still pretty cool to the touch on my lips even felt smidge icey in this stincker of a day lol https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … bb0d84.jpg

Hardness is diagnostic for topaz as mentioned. Go to "Series on identifying minerals" and list as many properties as possible.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

2 users like this post: LoneWolf, roddosnow

#28

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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30 January 2018 11:14 am

hAyyoUinAU wrote:

https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … esting.jpg

Found this whilst prospecting for gold. The GPZ liked it, and so did the makro obviously (it likes a lot).
It weighed over 5 kilos and I brought it back and broke it down. I haven't crushed it yet, but will do one piece tonight.
What got me interested is besides the silvery minerals visible, is that the pinpointers both go off on it.

Has anyone come across anything similar looking?

Not a single mineral but a rock - need close up photos of minerals in it for identification.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

1 user likes this post: roddosnow

#29

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

1 user likes this post: roddosnow

#30

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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30 January 2018 11:18 am

hAyyoUinAU wrote:

Just crushed some and panned it out. Could only see heavy pyrites.

So maybe its just highly mineralised and sets the pin pointers off. Not sure.

I will test it out with Minelabs latest pin pointer and see if it grunts or not. That will be interesting.

Looks like a veinlet of pyrite in silicified greenstone (rock) but would need more info.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

2 users like this post: LoneWolf, roddosnow

#31

goldierocks
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30 January 2018 11:21 am

hAyyoUinAU wrote:
LoneWolf wrote:

Might have to wait for some cooler temps Shaza... roll if ever that happens...

Very interesting hayyou... Keen to know your crush results... 8) Tin or Silver is my guess too... and a vein of Pyrite?

LW....

I haven't had experience panning silver or tin..lol. I know that whatever it is, it is not malleable. It crushed with pressure.

This is at 50x

https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … 11_pro.jpg

Very unlikely to be silver and tin does not occur as tin metal but as a dark and often translucent mineral. cassiterite. Go to "Series on identifying minerals" and list as many properties as possible, especially hardness and streak


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

2 users like this post: LoneWolf, roddosnow

#32

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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30 January 2018 11:23 am

LoneWolf wrote:

Some more hints might help like......Is it heavy or light?. Lots lying around or is it the only piece there.. location of your find may help too... Don't need exact place but area would help.. and a close-up to see the 'structure' of the minerals. hmm thumbsup

Magnetite?, Galena? it could be... need more info to be more accurate.... smile

LW....

Yes, good advice - close up and more properties. At a guess not galena - if it were magnetite it would be magnetic


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

2 users like this post: LoneWolf, roddosnow

#33

LoneWolf
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From: Gold Coast, QLD
Joined: 12 April 2016
Posts: 4,641
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30 January 2018 01:07 pm

Thanks goldieroks... thumbsup It can be hard with only a pic and no info...Thank-you for your effort posting these Topics... Very handy indeed... thumbsup

Now to get Everyone to look at them... angel

LW....


Growing Old is Inevitable.... Growing Up is Optional.... Union Proud and Union Strong... A.M.W.U Active Member....

#34

hAyyoUinAU
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From: Brisbane, QLD
Joined: 30 July 2017
Posts: 1,364
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30 January 2018 06:50 pm

goldierocks wrote:
hAyyoUinAU wrote:

Just crushed some and panned it out. Could only see heavy pyrites.

So maybe its just highly mineralised and sets the pin pointers off. Not sure.

I will test it out with Minelabs latest pin pointer and see if it grunts or not. That will be interesting.

Looks like a veinlet of pyrite in silicified greenstone (rock) but would need more info.

Thanks Goldierocks. Makes sense. It did pan as heavies, but crushed with pressure. Pyrite it is.

I guess its mineralised enough in some spots to register on metal detectors. I will still keep some pieces of it. Still cool.

Once again, thank you for your time and expertise. It is much appreciated.


GPZ 7000 + Equinox 800

#35

RedDirtDigger
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From: Central West , NSW
Joined: 29 April 2014
Posts: 284
Member
02 February 2018 12:01 am

Shaza1 wrote:
LoneWolf wrote:

Quartz I think Shaza... Topaz feels 'cool' if you put it on your lips compared to Quartz...... smile Thank-you for posting in the Correct area.... thumbsup

LW....

Thanks LW,
I took your advice but kinda hard to get correct temp when it’s 45c out here but surprisingly I took a few from my pile and they where still pretty cool to the touch on my lips even felt smidge icey in this stincker of a day lol https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … bb0d84.jpg

Shaza, some your mixed bag of different types of quartz pieces look like they are definitely waste material from aboriginal tool making. (I have done some ab site recording in my time). Were some of the pieces found on the surface?, in the same area? cheers RDD


Landcruiser LC79, GPZ 7000, GPX4500. Gold, Diamonds, Emeralds & meteorites.

#36

Jaxon96
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Joined: 13 January 2018
Posts: 23
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03 February 2018 01:11 pm

Hey everyone.
Just wondering if youse can tell me what this is
It's hard solid.
Magnetic highly.
Silvery
It's 24.5 grams
An then 4.5 gravity

Here's a photo thought platinum at first but not sure now 1517623819_img_0864.jpg

1517623852_img_0863.jpg

1 user likes this post: silver

#37

Shaza1
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Joined: 28 October 2017
Posts: 32
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03 February 2018 02:19 pm

goldierocks wrote:

It does look like it has parallel cleavage surfaces (very rare in quartz). But what is its hardness? Topaz is 8 on Moh's scale sp will scratch quartz - quartz cannot scratch topaz

I just tried to scratch them with a peice of quartz defiantly no scratch marks the quartz just put like powder lines on there which just wiped off, also tryed a steel nail, stainless steel knife and a drill bit no scratches....

Last edited by Shaza1 (03 February 2018 03:16 pm)

#38

Shaza1
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Joined: 28 October 2017
Posts: 32
Member
03 February 2018 02:25 pm

RedDirtDigger wrote:
Shaza1 wrote:
LoneWolf wrote:

Quartz I think Shaza... Topaz feels 'cool' if you put it on your lips compared to Quartz...... smile Thank-you for posting in the Correct area.... thumbsup

LW....

Thanks LW,
I took your advice but kinda hard to get correct temp when it’s 45c out here but surprisingly I took a few from my pile and they where still pretty cool to the touch on my lips even felt smidge icey in this stincker of a day lol https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … bb0d84.jpg

Shaza, some your mixed bag of different types of quartz pieces look like they are definitely waste material from aboriginal tool making. (I have done some ab site recording in my time). Were some of the pieces found on the surface?, in the same area? cheers RDD

Hey RDD yea I mainly find them on or close to the serface in the Adelaide hills, near and old track and creek bed smile also on the higher points in the hills aswell

Last edited by Shaza1 (03 February 2018 02:47 pm)

#39

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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04 February 2018 09:49 am

Jaxon96 wrote:

Hey everyone.
Just wondering if youse can tell me what this is
It's hard solid.
Magnetic highly.
Silvery
It's 24.5 grams
An then 4.5 gravity

Here's a photo thought platinum at first but not sure now https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … g_0864.jpg

https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … g_0863.jpg

Definitely not platinum. Streak is likely to help you most (see my recent post on streak). Photo looks like an iron oxide. You say it is slightly magnetic - one problem with the iron oxide minerals (magnetite Fe3O4, hematite Fe2O3, limonite FeO(OH)·nH2O but variable) is that one can change to another near the Earth surface. For example, magnetite might change to hematite or limonite (and more commonly hematite changes to limonite). Why? If you have a look at the chemical formulae, there is a higher ratio of oxygen to iron from those on the left relative to those on the right in my list, e.g 4 to 3 (4/3 = 1.3) in magnetite but 3 to 2 (3/2 = 1.5) in hematite (and limonite is even higher again in its oxygen to iron ratio). And limonite has water as part of its composition. So near surface the atmosphere and rain are supplying oxygen and water to convert one mineral to another.

However the process may be incomplete. So you can end up with a lump that looks like limonite and has its streak, but there may be tiny remnant bits of magnetite in it, sufficient to make it appear slightly magnetic still if you don't realise that more than one mineral is present. So you need to examine it closely under your hand lens to check for this, and make sure that you are testing just one mineral at a time. For example the streak you get may represent the bulk of the specimen, but if you see different grains in it, try getting their streak by scratching the small grains with the point of a fine sharp pocket knife blade. And to test for magnetism, always use a bar magnet and hang it from a bit of string or leather thong - hold the specimen in one hand and bring the end of the magnet towards it - if the mineral you are testing is magnetic the magnet will be pulled sideways towards the grain you are testing (because it is dangling from string it is a very sensitive test). That way you can test small grains within a single larger lump of a different mineral.

Why am I confident that it is not platinum? Because platinum has a silvery colour and a strongly metallic lustre:

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=plat … tMGAY--pcM:

When you want to see what a mineral looks like, Google its name plus photo (e.g. "platinum photo"). But beware! The photos you see of minerals that can occur as the native metal (like gold. silver, copper. platinum, bismuth, osmiridium etc) will be mixed in with photos of the pure synthetic refined metal (which can look different). So in this case I googled "platinum nugget photo" to get photos of the natural mineral ("platinum mineral photo" would probably also work). Unfortunately Google is not perfect though and often even then you will get a mixture of natural and synthetic mineral photos nevertheless (e.g bismuth is such an example. because people like making synthetic crystals of native bismuth because they are so attractive).

Lots of tricks of the trade!

Last edited by goldierocks (04 February 2018 09:53 am)


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

2 users like this post: silver, MegsyB007

#40

samrota
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From: Adelaide
Joined: 17 November 2016
Posts: 188
Member
04 February 2018 10:47 am

Found this lump of slag in the local goldfields on Friday. Is about fist size, highly magnetic and sends the SDC crazy.

Broke it open hoping for the best.

My question, is it from the old timers melting gold or from a steel foundry/Blacksmith?

1517701470_image.jpg


Gpz 7000

2 users like this post: silver, malri_au

#41

samrota
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From: Adelaide
Joined: 17 November 2016
Posts: 188
Member
04 February 2018 11:02 am

1517702571_image.jpg


Gpz 7000

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#42

silver
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Joined: 19 December 2013
Posts: 17,485
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04 February 2018 12:19 pm

I'd a thought the smithy would'a bought in his steel already to go, or been fixing old stuff.... would he get much slag on a meltdown and pour ?
You have a good question there sam. thumbsup
when I've detected older workshop sites I've mainly found lost and misplaced things in noisy ground but never taken notice of the clinker to put it to mind properly. neutral


What a great day ! ,... " I'll see you in the field ".

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#43

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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04 February 2018 01:13 pm

I see you are from Adelaide - if you are in the Adelaide Hills-Flinders it is more likely slag from smelting copper or lead. There were a number of smelters.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

2 users like this post: malri_au, samrota

#44

samrota
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From: Adelaide
Joined: 17 November 2016
Posts: 188
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04 February 2018 01:24 pm

I was detecting Jupiter Creek goldfields.

Quite heavy for it's size too.


Gpz 7000

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#45

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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04 February 2018 04:13 pm

Not aware of smelters there - are you sure it wasn't dumped from elsewhere. Or could it be boiler slag (molten glass residue from coal) from the boiler that drove winding gear - there is a large stone chimney and flue at Jupiter Creek?


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

2 users like this post: malri_au, samrota

#46

Dron
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From: Wollongong, NSW
Joined: 06 March 2016
Posts: 240
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05 February 2018 12:46 pm

samrota wrote:

Found this lump of slag in the local goldfields on Friday. Is about fist size, highly magnetic and sends the SDC crazy.

Broke it open hoping for the best.

My question, is it from the old timers melting gold or from a steel foundry/Blacksmith?

https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au … _image.jpg

Certainly interesting whatever it turns out to be. I guess you might have to crush one up and see if it has any gold in it?

Maybe it could be the accumulated crud from the bottom of a stamper battery? Maybe just in case wear a dust mask while crushing it in case it still has some mercury residue in it.


SDC2300 aka "The Birdshot Bandit" + SP01 + Gog Phones. Equinox 800 aka "Johnny kNOXville" + Tyger Snake digger. Wollongong based.

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#47

malri_au
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From: Adelaide & Victoria
Joined: 02 February 2018
Posts: 497
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05 February 2018 01:13 pm

pig iron slag would be my guess.


Minelab SD2000|Bounty Hunter Quickdraw II|BH Pinpointer|Recirc Sluice|Pan|Noggin|Nubnutz|GM1000

1 user likes this post: samrota

#48

malri_au
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From: Adelaide & Victoria
Joined: 02 February 2018
Posts: 497
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05 February 2018 01:16 pm

basically just some iron rocks that have had a fire on top or near,enough to part fuse into cruddy iron.

they would do this,then crush it,get the heavies and do another melt,keep going till purified.

copper is similar but you need carbon addition to trade bonds or something.


Minelab SD2000|Bounty Hunter Quickdraw II|BH Pinpointer|Recirc Sluice|Pan|Noggin|Nubnutz|GM1000

1 user likes this post: samrota

#49

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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06 February 2018 11:27 am

Shaza1 wrote:
goldierocks wrote:

It does look like it has parallel cleavage surfaces (very rare in quartz). But what is its hardness? Topaz is 8 on Moh's scale sp will scratch quartz - quartz cannot scratch topaz

I just tried to scratch them with a peice of quartz defiantly no scratch marks the quartz just put like powder lines on there which just wiped off, also tryed a steel nail, stainless steel knife and a drill bit no scratches....

But of course you want to do the reverse as well (will your specimens scratch quartz). Otherwise you might just be trying to scratch quartz with quartz....


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#50

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 3,280
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06 February 2018 11:32 am

malri_au wrote:

basically just some iron rocks that have had a fire on top or near,enough to part fuse into cruddy iron.

they would do this,then crush it,get the heavies and do another melt,keep going till purified.

copper is similar but you need carbon addition to trade bonds or something.

As mentioned, glassy slag would accumulate at the bottom of boiler fires and be cleaned out occassionally - there was a boiler there because there is a chimney (would have been used to drive the winding gear on a shaft I imagine). The glass forms from the residue when coal is burnt and settles to the bottom (all coal contains some silica as quartz particles).


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

1 user likes this post: malri_au

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