You are not logged in.

  • Register to access all forum features  

#1

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
31 January 2017 11:09 am

I was visiting a friend yesterday, when he showed me a cooking pot with some brown liquid in it. On closer inspection i saw it had rocks in it.
When we started pulling out the rocks some beautiful color appeared. He explained to me that it was fairy opal and he was treating it with sugar to bring the color out.
He went on to say that it couldn't be cabbed because the rock was a sandstone and was too porous so he was experimenting by pre shaping and then cooking.

I was lucky enough to be given a piece to play with and started doing a little reading. From what i have seen it seems that fairy opal can be treated with either oil or sugar, but then it needs to be stabilized after.
The only hint to stabilization was when liquid glass was mentioned, but another company seem to have a method of stabilizing so they can grind and polish rather than relying on the epoxy as a finish.

Just wondering if anyone has had any experience in treating fairy opal and if there are any tips?
IMG_1241_zpsncjhmolg.jpg
IMG_1239_zps35m0bsgo.jpg
IMG_1243_zpsoya4xzg2.jpg
IMG_1244_zpsuwwcqiuz.jpg


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

8 users like this post: Heatho, silver, Rockhound, Wishfull, KIM-MARGARET, ktmman, Detectist, Nena

#2

AtomRat
Member
From: Katazone, VIC
Joined: 22 May 2014
Posts: 5,107
Member
31 January 2017 11:02 pm

My old man had just been up there not long ago and explained the odd sugar soak n bake methods 8)
rather trippy stuff i say! From what I remember, it seems the rocks cant be polished by cab and Im pretty sure he said he just used clear nail polish 2 coats for final look? You got a rippa sample!


Wisdom is knowing how little you know

1 user likes this post: shivan

#3

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
31 January 2017 11:41 pm

Cheers AR, i started getting a bit worried as i read a few methods that involved soaking the stone in concentrated sulfuric acid after the sugar treatment. But i believe this is for the andamooka matrix opal, which i believe has a limestone matrix rather than sandstone.

I have some opticon that i brought to treat porous bolder opal and may give that a go after i treat it. Not in a hurry so i will keep reading at the moment.


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

1 user likes this post: AtomRat

#4

Bushbear
Member
Joined: 30 January 2017
Posts: 15
Member
02 February 2017 09:33 pm

Hi shivan.
Whilst I have never had anything to do with this type of opal during my last cutting course the instructor touched on this method.
My understanding is the sugar /acid treatment is instead of polishing as it leaves the matrix with a clear gloss finish.
The liquid glass is a two pack that is applied to a stone to fill in any imperfections and as before it cannot be polished after application.
But the results are supposed to be quite good.


Above ground or below life doesn’t get any better than when prospecting.

1 user likes this post: shivan

#5

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
02 February 2017 11:14 pm

Cheers Bushbear.
Will have a play and see what i can come up with big_smile


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

#6

blisters
Member
From: , ACT
Joined: 19 April 2015
Posts: 959
Member
03 February 2017 01:45 am

It is pretty but given the size and the relative lack of colour per sample size I wouldn't expend too much effort if any if you were looking to sell it, there is heaps of opal on dark matrix around which give a far better result. But as a specimen one solution I heard of is to soak the specimen in multiple dips of very diluted mix of water and aquadhere which then sticks loose material together but also seals and coats the rock which might be a useful trick if you slice and flatten on a wheel first. This technique is used to stick and coat fragile crystal specimens together as told by a seller of crystals but I have never tried it.

Jon

Last edited by blisters (03 February 2017 01:53 am)

2 users like this post: AtomRat, shivan

#7

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
03 February 2017 09:26 am

Cheers for the info blisters. Have not heard of the aquadhere before it looks interesting. May be a cheaper alternative to opticon.

The piece i have seems to show color around the middle more than the top or bottom. I will just be happy if i end up with a small specimen piece but will probably take a slice and maybe have a play with shaping before i treat it.

I am not under any illusions with the bit i have, when seeing rocks that were already treated i noticed some showed color a lot better than others and i have no idea what they looked like before being treated.
Its more out of interest that i would like to have a play. Plus if i could figure out a decent way to stabilize it would help the gent that gave me the piece as i believe he is just using liquid glass at the moment.


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

1 user likes this post: AtomRat

#8

Jukebox
Member
Joined: 19 June 2014
Posts: 157
Member
08 February 2017 11:01 am

Gday Mate,

The only fairy treatment I have seen is with the Adamooka matrix opal - they used sugar and a whole lot of acid to get the colour out with good results.
The acid was key, the miner was going on about how its now a controlled substance and you cant get loads of it anymore.

In terms of boulder i havent seen results of a similar caliber/success as its a completely different stone.

Sorry I couldn't be any more help.

Jukey

1 user likes this post: shivan

#9

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
08 February 2017 05:45 pm

Cheers Jukebox, its defiantly not andamooka (which from my understanding is a limestone matrix?) from what the bloke told me.
The opal in the rock seems to be in grains rather than seams or veins like the bolder opal i have seen, though you would know a lot more about opal than me.

As it was a gift to experiment with, there is no loss if i mess up. I will probably end up cooking it with sugar and treating it with opticon to stabilize. Even if i don't get the color he did on his pieces, if i can work out a decent way to stabilize for polishing it will be worth it.


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

1 user likes this post: Jukebox

#10

Jukebox
Member
Joined: 19 June 2014
Posts: 157
Member
09 February 2017 09:30 am

A lot of fairy opal i have didnt need to be treated once polished up - let me know how the treatment goes i have buckets of the stuff!

#11

KarlS
Member
From: Blacktown, NSW
Joined: 14 February 2014
Posts: 678
Member
01 March 2017 09:13 pm

I used to mine opal in Coober Pedy in seventies and had friend in Andamooka. He used to make pretty cabs from matrix opal, using sugar and sulphuric acid. What he explained to me is that the sugar fill pores in the stone and the acid converts sugar to carbon. He told me it should work on any porous stone.
Karl


White's SPP, XTERRA 705, old Tandy detector

2 users like this post: blisters, shivan

#12

goldierocks
Member
Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,649
Member
02 March 2017 10:12 pm

Yes, I have seen it mostly done at Andamooka. They get a small price for this as decorative stone. Not in limestone there. As KarlS says it gives a dark matrix by converting sugar to carbon.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#13

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
03 March 2017 12:28 am

Goldierocks, i have personally never been to any opal fields yet (still hope to do the rounds one day) and am sure not all opal in Andamooka is in limestone, i believe the majority is in shale, but from my understanding the Andamooka opal matrix is in limestone, just wondering why you say its not? I keep hearing and reading so much contradictory information it can get frustrating sometimes.

Again the piece i am playing with is not Andamooka, i believe it is from somewhere closer to Mintabie. In the process of setting up the garage, so wont get a chance to have a play for a while yet.

From https://www.facebook.com/notes/aussie-o … 997845221/ :
"Opal at Andamooka exists in the thin marine Bulldog Shale, which is the significant portion of the Marree Subgroup of Early Cretaceous period.

It is usually overlies Algebuckina Sandstone or tours directly onto pre-Mesozoic stones. The top sub-unit of Bulldog Shale referred as “kopi” by the miners, which compromises with high- weathered and white-sandy clay with dotted, huge changeable boulders. At the bottom of the kopi, there is a wide-ranging and sandy boulder bed.
It is referred as a solid or multinational band, which consist several stones, cobbles, and stone of pre-Mesozoic rocks, primarily Arcoona Quartzite. Underneath the conglomerate band is a fair brown, yellow or grey clay stone with a low-sand substance known as the “mud”. Opal at Andamooka takes place primarily at one perspective, referred by the miners as the level.
With the contact of the multi-national band and the muck, other sub-levels (squibby levels) that transpire above the major level, but none are as well-known, permanent or dynamic. The main opal diversity generated is crystal opal (visible to transparent). Matrix opal is grey stone with sparks of colour, which is usually formed as an alternative of limestone boulders.
In fact, both matrix opals can be treated by drenched and through the use of sugar solution and boiled sulphuric acid to cast a shadow the body tone as well as, to improve the play of colour. The tough rock, termed stone by the miners, which is 50 metres in thickness, the base, which resembling the bottom of the Stuart Range escarpment.
Through this weathered zone, the rock is usually bleached in white or multi-coloured, silty or dirty clay stone with kaolinite as the leading clay stone. The setting of the weathered contour varies, and most of the opal miners think even slight variations, which is significant in finding opal."

http://lapidaryworld.com/pdf/Treating_Opal.pdf
http://www.johnosopals.com/2010/11/trea … atrix-opal

Last edited by shivan (03 March 2017 12:32 am)


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

#14

goldierocks
Member
Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,649
Member
03 March 2017 01:26 pm

I am a geo doing a study of all the opal fields and have visited them all on a 7 week field trip (and before and since). Not aware of any in limestone opal host at Andamooka, certainly all "fairy stone" that I have seen is sandstone (there are multiple elevations of opal though). You say "Matrix opal is grey stone with sparks of colour, which is usually formed as an alternative of limestone boulders". That does not make sense to me (grammatically or geologically) - I suspect a typo or something. There are some carbonate rocks in the Cadna-Owie Formation and some minor carbonate grains as sparse matrix in some other sandstone so it is not impossible - maybe they are saying that the opal in fairy stone fills tiny cavities left when the few carbonate grains of a sandstone matrix weather out (definitely possible). If so, the proportion of carbonate grains ("limestone") is and was tiny, because the proprtion of opal in the rock is small as specks and any carbonate left would dissolve during acid treatment and spoil the fairy rock. A geologist would not call the rock limestone either way.....

However I was referring to your comment that "definitely not andamooka (which from my understanding is a limestone matrix". I have seen fairy stone from various fields but mostly from Andamooka, and most opal at Andamooka is not in limestone. Fairy stone is not my interest - a low value, modified rock ised to make a few bob from stuff otherwise worthless, Looks nice in aquariums etc.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#15

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
03 March 2017 02:04 pm

Again please do not think i am saying you are wrong goldierocks, i am just trying to get my information straight.
I only started reading a bit about the Andamooka matrix opal because there was a lot of information on treating it, as oppose to fairy opal (sandstone matrix which i was asking about to start with).

This interested me as i had not heard of opal forming in limestone. Unfortunately as i have two kids and a homeloan and am studying with little work, all i can do is read about these places and hope to be able to visit one day ( Don't suppose you are looking for an unqualified assistant at all? wink ).

The link i posted was probably not the best, but that and the other two links i posted below all refer to the Andamooka matrix being limestone. Though these are more lapidary links than geological, but as there were so many references to it being limestone i assumed they knew what they were talking about. Will keep reading and see what else i can come up with.

From http://lapidaryworld.com/pdf/Treating_Opal.pdf
"Andamooka matrix opal:
Strictly from the sense of its physical formation, all opal is formed in
cavities of opportunity. Sometimes the cavities are large as in 'slides' or
'levels' which produce thick solid slabs; sometimes isolated as in a clam
shell; and sometimes intruding into fine fissures in hard native stone such as
ironstone.
But when opal filters into ancient layers of limestone, something truly
miraculous occurs.
Limestone is formed over millions of years by the death of countless
microscopic plants and animals in waters and bays. The Cliffs of Dover are
a well known example. The skeletons or fossils of these early life forms
persist, and create myriads opportunities for the intrusion of opal, if the
conditions are right.
The microscopic cavities in limestone prevent the opal from forming what
we recognize as solid opal with thick layers of fire. However, the opal does
form the microscopic equivalent, within these tiny cavities. With the aid of a
microscope, one can see a reticulated effect, varying somewhat between the
eye of a dragonfly and the skin of a snake.
Limestone appears to us usually as a very white chalk-like stone. This is
detrimental to the fire of any opal which has intruded the matrix. There is
too much diffraction of the light for any specific color to assert itself to our
eyes. Therefore, in the natural state, limestone containing opal appears to
have color, but it is washed out and faint. For this reason, it was not viewed
as marketable when first discovered.
But when the matrix is wetted, that unmistakable opal fire is there, and no
doubt much time went into thinking about just how this material might be
treated.
One place in the world where limestone matrix opal occurs, is in a small
area of South Australia called Andamooka
"

And from http://www.johnosopals.com/2010/11/trea … atrix-opal
"Andamooka matrix opal is basically a limestone base rock impregnated with tiny pieces of precious opal. Because the limestone is very pale it is often difficult to see the play of opal colour in the stone and hence a method of darkening the limestone background was developed so the colour of the opal could be seen."


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

#16

Mr Magoo
Member
Joined: 04 May 2014
Posts: 791
Member
03 March 2017 03:00 pm

Just for interests sakes the bottom of this page https://www.opalauctions.com/nl/learn/o … o-treat-it explains the treatment process of acid and sugar.
Which does bare the question of Limestone and Sulfuric acid, interesting article all the same for non opal pro's.

#17

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
03 March 2017 03:34 pm

Cheers Mr Magoo, that was another of the links i have found in my searches.

I had also wondered about the treatment of acid on a limestone, but had just put it down to the sugar treatment somehow stabilising the limestone before the acid...

Again i was only going off what i had been able to find so far, but i find the lapidary world a funny place. It seems full of myth, word of mouth and made up names for common minerals and rocks in a bid to sell them for more money.


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

#18

goldierocks
Member
Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,649
Member
07 March 2017 01:35 pm

Shivan - the fuller description makes more sense. I don't remember seeing it, but it may well be present in small quantities and I have no reason to doubt it given the description (I was also confusing fairy opal and matrix opal - they are not strict geological terms and therefore I don't use them). More a case of whether it just occurs at Andamooka (as it may) or dominates (which I don't think it does). I would not expect the sugar to do anything to stabilise it. The sugar solution enters the pores of the rock - the acid then reduces the sugar, a carbon-bearing compound (C12H22O11), to carbon and thus gives a dark colour to the matrix. The purpose of the sugar is as a compund to convert to carbon to give the black colour. I remember as a kid we used to mix potassium nitrate and sugar then add acid (don't do it - the reaction generates heat and will explode, we let the acid soak through cotton wool to get away)- giving potassium nitrate plus carbon (gunpowder). Stupid kids. Much like ANFO we use in mines - a mixture of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil, which is nice and stable to pour down drill-holes until you add a stick of gelignite with detanator to it when you blast. Even then it can be unstable (a cement mixer mixing the stuff wiped out the port of Halifax, Nova Scotia, years ago).


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

1 user likes this post: shivan

#19

goldierocks
Member
Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 1,649
Member
07 March 2017 01:55 pm

Shivan, I chased down the answer. I could not recall seeing limestone beds in the mines at Andamooka, but I now know the answer. There is a conglomerate bed in part of the rock sequence which contains boulders of various rocks, and some are limestone boulders (they are not part of the sequence that formed where it is now, but have been eroded from limestone beds some distance away to form boulders, and only then washed together to form the conglomerate bed at Andamooka after transportation in flowing water - so the limestone formed elsewhere and was brought there as boulders). Then the opal replaced it. This should make it clear. As I thought the overwhelming majority of opal at Andamooka does not replace limestone (I have been down a number of mines there). So - yes it occurs, no it does not dominate and we were both half correct.

"Opal at Andamooka occurs in the shallow marine Bulldog Shale, part of the Marree Subgroup of Early Cretaceous age, which overlies Algebuckina Sandstone or laps directly onto pre-Mesozoic rocks (Fig. 2). The top sub-unit of Bulldog Shale, calledkopi by the miners, consists of highly weathered white sandy clay with scattered, large erratic boulders. At the base of the kopi there is an extensive sandy boulder bed, called the concrete or conglomerate band, which contains numerous pebbles, cobbles and boulders of pre-Mesozoic rocks, chiefly Arcoona Quartzite. Beneath the conglomerate band is a pale brown, grey or yellow claystone with a low sand content referred to as the mud.

Opal at Andamooka occurs predominantly at one horizon, referred to by miners as the level, at the contact of the conglomerate band and the mud. Other sub-levels (squibby levels) occur above the main level but none are as prominent, continuous or productive.

The main opal varieties produced are crystal opal (transparent to translucent), white opal, and some black opal. Painted ladies are boulders, generally of quartzite, which split along a fracture to reveal a coating of opal. Matrix opal is cloudy stone with flashes of colour, which is thought to form by replacement of limestone boulders in the conglomerate band. Opalised sandstone or opalstone forms by deposition of opal in the spaces between the quartz grains in sandstone boulders. Both matrix and opal sandstone can be treated by soaking in sugar solution and boiling in sulphuric acid to darken the body colour and enhance the play of colour".

So now you have an accurate answer.....and the opal has probably already replaced any limestone so that there is none left to dissolve in acid. Hope that helps.

Attached is a photo I took of a "Painted Lady", a boulder coated with opal. We call boulders like this dropstones - they formed far away and were rafted on top of floating ice where glaciers met the Cretaceous sea, until the ice melted and they dropped far from shore and far from their source area. It was cold in the Cretaceous - you may have heard of the opal "pneapples" of White Cliffs - they replace ikaite crystals (a calcium carbonate mineral different to calcite). Today we only find ikaite crystals in the cold bottom muds of Norwegian fiords. Photo also shown of a White Cliffs "pineapple".

1488855149_painted_lady.jpg

1488855315_pineapple.jpg


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

1 user likes this post: shivan

#20

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
07 March 2017 05:49 pm

Thank you very much for that info Goldierocks, it makes a lot more sense that the limestone was in the conglomerate and was replaced by the opal, than the opal forming in the limestone.
As i said it can get confusing sometimes when i get conflicting information, so its a huge help getting to the bottom of it.

I do understand the sugar solution is there to be converted to carbon. When i thought the Andamooka matrix was limestone, i again just assumed there must have been something protecting the calcium carbonate from the acid and all i could see was the sugar. So again this process makes more sense knowing its not a limestone matrix.

I have heard of opal being found in dropstones, but never seen it myself, as i had heard of opal pseudomorphs but never seen any before.
That White cliffs pineapple looks very interesting.


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

#21

Keen Ken
Member
Joined: 19 February 2013
Posts: 204
Member
07 March 2017 09:00 pm

If the opal replaced the limestone wouldn't the whole stone be opalised?,and not opal impregnated as it appears to be under magnification. You can see the sand grains.
The use of the work "concrete" on the opal fields has been used for decades.
My guess would be the use of that word has given rise to the thought of the matrix consisting of some sort of limestone, which we know is not the case, else the sulphuric acid would dissolve the "limestone" during the treatment of the matrix.
I did try the acid-sugar treatment years ago on some Queensland sandstone matrix (like what was pictured). I found the sandstone had a fair percentage of gypsum which dissolved and the sandstone fell apart.
I do know the commonly used technique for blackening and stabilising sandstone matrix but this process is now under patent (not by me). Not willing to risk my neck here.

1 user likes this post: shivan

#22

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
07 March 2017 10:18 pm

G'day Ken, when i first read about talk of the Andamooka matrix being limestone and the opal being impregnated i assumed it was similar to the sandstone. As i have only looked at photos online it is hard to make out any fine details.

I was wondering if perhaps the opal only partially replaced bits of the limestone, or if it was replacing the whole rock? Because if it was fully replacing it, i would think as you say it would just be opal and not a matrix opal? But if it only partially replaces the limestone one would have to think the rest of the limestone was at least altered if not replaced by something else because there seems to be no reaction during the acid stage of treatment?

I guess a bit more reading is in order.

I do know the commonly used technique for blackening and stabilising sandstone matrix but this process is now under patent (not by me). Not willing to risk my neck here.

I fully understand, again i am just happy for some conformation that there is a different treatment for the fairy opal. I did read about a company claiming to have their own patented technique for treating fairy opal, but was not sure if they were talking about acid or not.

As i said i have some opticon handy so will give that a try on a small piece after treating it with sugar, if it works great, if not nothing lost from having a go.


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

#23

Keen Ken
Member
Joined: 19 February 2013
Posts: 204
Member
08 March 2017 09:07 pm

Hi Doug,
I did experiment with sandstone matrix opal placing it in "Spirit Stain" (ebony in colour) with mixed results. It did substantially darken the sandstone but having bigger fish to fry at the time I left it at that. Our material was rather soft and needed stabilising with resin.
I used to pay a guy to carbonise and stabilise preshaped pieces at a cost of 50cents per gram for each process ($1 per gram for both processes).
Some came out really nice but most was just pin fire green, blue or pink predominantly. There was a small percentage that had lovely blocky patterns of intense green.

Not including my time sorting, sawing shaping and finishing it was costing about $10 per piece, so to make it worth while we needed to sell each piece for around $25 to $40 to be able to make any money. Not a big seller.

Most pieces were about 20mm x 15 mm x 5mm thick.

This was a by product when mining for pipe opal, when times are tough you will try anything to make an income.

Last edited by Keen Ken (08 March 2017 09:08 pm)

1 user likes this post: shivan

#24

shivan
Member
From: Nowra, south coast NSW
Joined: 15 February 2013
Posts: 1,082
Member
09 March 2017 12:18 am

Its a shame it did not sell better for you. I think some of it looks really nice, but i have heard a lot of people say they wont waste time with it. But after treatment and playing around it does seem to add up.

Was there much of it around?

Hi Doug,

Oh its Ian by the way..... Unless you were talking to someone else? lol

Last edited by shivan (09 March 2017 12:21 am)


Minelab GP Extreme 11" & 18" DD, 2 highbankers, EZ river sluice and a growing collection of sieves and pans

#25

Keen Ken
Member
Joined: 19 February 2013
Posts: 204
Member
09 March 2017 10:05 am

Sorry Ian,
Just messaging someone buy the name before,
There was not a great deal where I was working.
The pipe opal occurs in gutters and the fairy opal with it on this particular field, if gutters were deep and the pipes were bright there would be some fairy opal along with them, didn't need to be much pipe opal, just good colour. The pipe opal of course is of much higher value that's what we we're chasing at the time, we kept everything as you can't tell when the next patch of pipe is going to come out.
When we came up with no reasonable pipe opal we had to treat the sandstone matrix to try and recover costs.
Yes it is beautiful but if you are trying to make a living it's very difficult to on fairy opal alone, let alone cover mining costs.
Unless you have substantial amounts of top hard material.
Areas around Opalton and Jundah have more substantial pipe opal deposits and i've been told in some places 1 foot thick and hard as concrete.
I was given some of that material and the colour was superb, it looked similar to top Amdamooka matrix in colour and pattern once carbonised.

1 user likes this post: shivan

Contact Us - Privacy Policy - Terms Of Service

View Desktop Site

Top