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#1

dean65
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Joined: 26 February 2014
Posts: 373
Member
03 October 2016 01:36 pm

Safety disclaimer: Exploring abandoned mineshafts is an extremely dangerous hobby, Prospecting Australia and any associated administrators and moderators will not be held responsible for any accidents, injury or deaths occuring due to people exploring abandoned mines. We do not recommend anyone to attempt such activities even if they do have relevant qualifications in abseiling, cave exploration and confined spaces.

These photos are from some of the abandoned underground mines near Ballarat.

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"Reverse the polarity"

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#2

Maltisau
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From: , SA
Joined: 16 January 2016
Posts: 196
Member
03 October 2016 03:59 pm

I LOVE looking through old mines. When I was a kid my father and I explored some magnificent mines in South Australia. Jupiter Creek was a good spot but I think the council has been meddling with the area. It was about 25 years ago though when people took responsibility for their own actions. I remember an adit with a shaft at one end. We used a home made rope ladder to climb in and walked out the other side. There was another shaft nearby that we explored which had several levels.

Another mine was on the way to Arkaroola. The whole family explored that one as far as the water table. There were huge cavernous areas and lots of quartz crystals in the mullock heaps.

I like the caves on the Fleurieu Peninsula too. A big one at Rapid Bay and sea caves at Second Valley. I must get back and explore the coastline further with a kayak.

So far I have only found the adit at Belltopper Hill. I can't wait to find more to explore once I have some training in ropes and abseiling.

Thanks for sharing dean65.

1 user likes this post: dean65

#3

magneticsand
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Joined: 13 July 2014
Posts: 158
Member
04 October 2016 03:17 am

Has anyone had a look at the golden stream (yes lol) mine on the main road of avoca?
I've wondered about it forever. From the size of the mullock it must have bee huge.

2 users like this post: Goldfev3r, dean65

#4

Hunting the yellow
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From: down a hole
Joined: 20 December 2012
Posts: 1,795
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07 October 2016 06:36 am

https://flic.kr/p/KFc1xK


A dream written down with a date becomes a goal a goal broken down into steps becomes a plan a plan backed by action becomes reality.

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#5

dean65
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Joined: 26 February 2014
Posts: 373
Member
10 October 2016 06:15 pm

The abandoned underground mines at Chewton often have some great colours in the rocks due to various unique geological factors.

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"Reverse the polarity"

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#6

Eldorado
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From: Goulburn, NSW
Joined: 21 July 2015
Posts: 1,389
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10 October 2016 08:02 pm

Amazing photos Dean,the lighting really does bring out some cool colours.

1 user likes this post: dean65

#7

dean65
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Joined: 26 February 2014
Posts: 373
Member
17 October 2016 12:36 pm

These abandoned mines at Talbot and Tarnagulla have some great features.

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"Reverse the polarity"

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#8

Mike70
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Joined: 14 April 2016
Posts: 188
Member
17 October 2016 12:56 pm

The amount of work that has gone into digging those mines staggers the imagination. Hard to think that all that rock was mostly dug out by hand. They sure bred 'em tough in those days.

Mike70.

Last edited by Mike70 (17 October 2016 12:57 pm)

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#9

Jaros
Moderator
From: S.E.Qld., QLD
Joined: 11 August 2013
Posts: 11,801
Moderator
17 October 2016 01:10 pm

Well, i know i wouldn't go down there!! yikes


F1A4M2, Exterra 705 Gold, Ace 250, Goldrat 8" Dreammat River Sluice.

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#10

Hunting the yellow
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From: down a hole
Joined: 20 December 2012
Posts: 1,795
Member
19 October 2016 02:26 am

Mike70 wrote:

The amount of work that has gone into digging those mines staggers the imagination. Hard to think that all that rock was mostly dug out by hand. They sure bred 'em tough in those days.

Mike70.

moved by hand yes but drilled and blasted after the 1850s with weak explosives then high explosives came into affect in the late 1860s to 70s


A dream written down with a date becomes a goal a goal broken down into steps becomes a plan a plan backed by action becomes reality.

2 users like this post: Mike70, dean65

#11

Hunting the yellow
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From: down a hole
Joined: 20 December 2012
Posts: 1,795
Member
26 October 2016 07:40 pm

gases safety please read

29889725254_6b7cc26729_k.jpg2016-10-24 03.23.14 by ,

30484018476_6d32115214_k.jpg2016-10-24 03.16.38 by ,

30483996866_982ba42e52_k.jpg2016-10-24 03.10.20 by ,


A dream written down with a date becomes a goal a goal broken down into steps becomes a plan a plan backed by action becomes reality.

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#12

dean65
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Joined: 26 February 2014
Posts: 373
Member
01 November 2016 05:36 pm

This mine near Ballarat is not well known. The main drive is 600 metres long with a number of side tunnels. Half way down the mine drive you will find a winze with a home made wooden bridge. This adit is now called the New Bridge of Death Mine.

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"Reverse the polarity"

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#13

Tathradj
Moderator
From: Tathra, NSW
Joined: 17 February 2014
Posts: 8,948
Moderator
01 November 2016 06:09 pm

About how deep is the Winze. ?
Fantastic Photo's. Would love to
see the mine one day


A couple of HiBankers inc. accessories, , QED, 4500, SDC2300, Gt1600,
Aldi, A Prado 4x4, A'Van Cruiseliner and a heck of a lot of determination.
Most importantly, A lot of Good Honest Friends. Maybe one day Lucky.

1 user likes this post: dean65

#14

Nightjar
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From: Waikiki, WA
Joined: 26 September 2013
Posts: 1,235
Member
01 November 2016 07:57 pm

When working for Alcoa Alumina and being a Fire & Rescue Captain the company sent me to Southern Mines Rescue facility in NSW for further training.
Was only 5 years after the Appin Mine disaster and during the course we were shown graphic photos of those who perished.
Very confronting seeing a miner sitting at a table in a lunch room, part of a sandwich still in his mouth, not a sign of injury but tragically dead.
Methane burns at the speed of light taking all oxygen with it, so fortunately these unfortunates never knew what happened.

http://www.mineaccidents.com.au/mine-ac … liery-1979


Happy Hunting, Nightjar.

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#15

Gem in I
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Joined: 11 June 2016
Posts: 557
Member
01 November 2016 07:57 pm

only recently I have taken up beeping for gold but have cracked open an explorer inside and these photos seem like you are passing through a giant gemstone.
I agree with and understand the disclaimer. I have a couple of noob questions. No I have many but a couple are,
in your 4th photo dean 65 did you explore that hidden room/tunnel behind the guy in pic.or have I played too many video games.
Second why all the dirt on the ground I mean I get the gravity conspiracy but with no erosion/weather type elements I would of thought the guys hooved the ground with the work involved for their creations and made their repeat travels easier?
Third do you sort of guys see yourselves as adventure's, explorer's or adrenalin type people. Sorry not trying to be to personal just in awe.


Patience is a learnt thing. Learnt it, sold it. Bought DETERMINATION.
sdc 2300, Willoughby's, sieves and a Zombie 7000

#16

dean65
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Joined: 26 February 2014
Posts: 373
Member
04 November 2016 11:31 pm

Tathradj wrote:

About how deep is the Winze. ?
Fantastic Photo's. Would love to
see the mine one day

About 6 metres deep.


"Reverse the polarity"

#17

dean65
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Joined: 26 February 2014
Posts: 373
Member
04 November 2016 11:35 pm

Nightjar wrote:

When working for Alcoa Alumina and being a Fire & Rescue Captain the company sent me to Southern Mines Rescue facility in NSW for further training.
Was only 5 years after the Appin Mine disaster and during the course we were shown graphic photos of those who perished.
Very confronting seeing a miner sitting at a table in a lunch room, part of a sandwich still in his mouth, not a sign of injury but tragically dead.
Methane burns at the speed of light taking all oxygen with it, so fortunately these unfortunates never knew what happened.

http://www.mineaccidents.com.au/mine-ac … liery-1979

That's why we go equiped with gas metres. Most of the time the air is fine in these old mines.


"Reverse the polarity"

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#18

dean65
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Joined: 26 February 2014
Posts: 373
Member
04 November 2016 11:42 pm

Gem in I wrote:

only recently I have taken up beeping for gold but have cracked open an explorer inside and these photos seem like you are passing through a giant gemstone.
I agree with and understand the disclaimer. I have a couple of noob questions. No I have many but a couple are,
in your 4th photo dean 65 did you explore that hidden room/tunnel behind the guy in pic.or have I played too many video games.
Second why all the dirt on the ground I mean I get the gravity conspiracy but with no erosion/weather type elements I would of thought the guys hooved the ground with the work involved for their creations and made their repeat travels easier?
Third do you sort of guys see yourselves as adventure's, explorer's or adrenalin type people. Sorry not trying to be to personal just in awe.

Hi, we did explore the tunnel behind the guy in the 4th pic. The dirt on the ground has been caused by the movement of air in and out of the mine over the last 150 years. Its essentially a build up of dust. "Mine exploration is a hobby in which people visit abandoned mines. Enthusiasts usually engage in such activities for the purpose of exploration and documentation. In many ways, however, it is closer to caving, with many participants actively interested in exploring both mines and caves." Hope this answers your questions.


"Reverse the polarity"

1 user likes this post: Gem in I

#19

dean65
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Joined: 26 February 2014
Posts: 373
Member
04 November 2016 11:48 pm

Nightjar wrote:

When working for Alcoa Alumina and being a Fire & Rescue Captain the company sent me to Southern Mines Rescue facility in NSW for further training.
Was only 5 years after the Appin Mine disaster and during the course we were shown graphic photos of those who perished.
Very confronting seeing a miner sitting at a table in a lunch room, part of a sandwich still in his mouth, not a sign of injury but tragically dead.
Methane burns at the speed of light taking all oxygen with it, so fortunately these unfortunates never knew what happened.

http://www.mineaccidents.com.au/mine-ac … liery-1979

Thanks for your article. Underground coal workings tend to be far more dangerous than gold mines. However, we are very safety minded and sometimes do not enter a mine if we are not happy with the conditions.


"Reverse the polarity"

#20

dean65
Member
Joined: 26 February 2014
Posts: 373
Member
07 November 2016 05:03 pm

After a number of unsuccessful attempts to enter underground mines at Clunes we had a major discovery of a multi-level working two weeks ago that contained a winze allowing access to lower drives.

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"Reverse the polarity"

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#21

goldierocks
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Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 2,026
Member
07 November 2016 05:26 pm

Do read the Safety and Survival section on this type of activity under Outdoor and Recreation - I have seen a lot of people die and you need to take all factors into consideration so as not to join them.


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

#22

goldierocks
Member
Joined: 10 January 2015
Posts: 2,026
Member
07 November 2016 05:47 pm

People totally underestimate gas - which is NOT confined to coal mines but common in our old gold mines.

ELAND

The bodies of 76 illegal miners were found in the shafts of a disused gold mine over the past week. The Eland shaft, owned by Harmony Gold, has been out of use for years - closed down for being too dangerous and unprofitable. Some of the miners had died in a fire that broke out on 18 May. Others had suffocated because of dangerous gasses seeping out of the rocks underground, authorities said.

LANGLAAGTE

1478501027_trapped.jpg

A mate got the contract to pull bodies of drowned miners out of the tanzanite mines - he found 42. Someone I kniow had a bunch of many students drown in Tasmania (a cave - usually less dangerous but same principle). Deaths occur even in Victorian tunnels (eg two in an adit at Eildon) - a mate nearly suffocated in central Victoria three years back and may have trouble working again, another mate suffocated at the bottom of a shallow shaft in Laverton WA......


Robert Benchley...
I have kleptomania, but when it gets bad, I take something for it.

1 user likes this post: dean65

#23

ben2363
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Joined: 05 April 2016
Posts: 155
Member
08 November 2016 07:43 am

Nice work Dean65. any chance on locations or names on the mines.

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#24

stoyve
Member
Joined: 01 May 2014
Posts: 1,258
Member
08 November 2016 10:42 pm

Gday Goldierocks,
It's really good of you to alert forum members of the many dangers in underground mine exploration.
But I thought I would let you know about Dean65 and the guys who go underground with him.
Dean is well practiced in this activity and uses a gas metre, also one of the team that goes with him is a very experienced miner who has been working underground in the Ballarat gold mine at Mt Clear.
He is very knowledgeable in every aspect of mine safety and always explains where and why there is a hazard.
For any other members of the forum who may be tempted to participate in this activity, BEWARE!!!
What may seem a benign or harmless mine maybe your last place on earth.
I have been going underground for nigh on 40 years and I never have or will take the dangers for granted.
Don't be tempted to go underground unless you go with someone who is knowledgeable and safety is there mantra.
Cheers Steve


"Closed mouth gathers no feet"

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#25

dean65
Member
Joined: 26 February 2014
Posts: 373
Member
21 November 2016 12:11 pm

Gem in I wrote:

only recently I have taken up beeping for gold but have cracked open an explorer inside and these photos seem like you are passing through a giant gemstone.
I agree with and understand the disclaimer. I have a couple of noob questions. No I have many but a couple are,
in your 4th photo dean 65 did you explore that hidden room/tunnel behind the guy in pic.or have I played too many video games.
Second why all the dirt on the ground I mean I get the gravity conspiracy but with no erosion/weather type elements I would of thought the guys hooved the ground with the work involved for their creations and made their repeat travels easier?
Third do you sort of guys see yourselves as adventure's, explorer's or adrenalin type people. Sorry not trying to be to personal just in awe.

The flow of air over the last 150 years has caused most of the dust on the ground.


"Reverse the polarity"


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